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View Full Version : The filmed war (italian translated newsreels)



Panzerknacker
08-14-2012, 09:27 AM
I am translating a bunch of Luce films, some of them very interesting beside the propagandistic tone.This is quite unique:http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=860_1344868217

Panzerknacker
08-16-2012, 06:33 PM
Assault engineers at el Alamein, september 1942. http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=24f_1344706098

leccy
08-17-2012, 07:51 AM
Assault engineers at el Alamein, september 1942. http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=24f_1344706098

First time I have seen how they operated the Brixma Model 35 mortar/grenade thrower, quite rapid fire as well.

Even in a propaganda film they could have given the blokes weapons to carry though, in most shots the majority had no weapon.

Nickdfresh
08-17-2012, 10:07 AM
First time I have seen how they operated the Brixma Model 35 mortar/grenade thrower, quite rapid fire as well.

Even in a propaganda film they could have given the blokes weapons to carry though, in most shots the majority had no weapon.

Maybe they'd shoot the camera crew? :)

leccy
08-17-2012, 10:34 AM
Maybe they'd shoot the camera crew? :)

Nah when we did training films we all carried weapons (we tried to find some mug to fire our rounds though so we would not have to clean our gats), still posed for the camera's though

Panzerknacker
08-17-2012, 06:34 PM
The assault engineers usually didnt carry rifles but pistols and explosive charges, some of them use flamethrowers and that could be seen on video.

leccy
08-18-2012, 06:45 AM
The assault engineers usually didnt carry rifles but pistols and explosive charges, some of them use flamethrowers and that could be seen on video.

Seems odd to not carry long arms or rapid fire weapons when you are doing an assault or trench raid, even if it is just simulating an attack on a MG position. It looked around 1 in 5 carried a rifle and hardly any had any web kit or packs for anything. Having done assaults as a Sapper they seem very very lightly armed and equipped.

It was obviously a staged propaganda film because of the camera positions, so maybe they just had what was required to stage the show.

Panzerknacker
08-22-2012, 05:45 PM
The costly capture of Bir hacheim, following the Ariete armored Division in may-june 1942.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=bb3_1345657170

Nickdfresh
08-22-2012, 06:35 PM
Interesting footage, especially showing how the Italians made use of giant wooden carts, or wagons, to ferry tanks to the battlefield...

Panzerknacker
08-23-2012, 08:34 PM
Probably easier to ferry thna german tanks given its relative light weight. Not such a strong wagon was needed.

leccy
08-24-2012, 03:02 AM
I was reading that around 150 of those trailers with their attendant tractor units could pretty much move a whole Italian Armoured Div in one lift.

Interesting battle against the (mostly) Free French.

Panzerknacker
09-04-2012, 12:56 PM
Yeap, notice the large quantity of sudanese and indian troops also captured. Brand new Flak train given by Hitler to Mussolini. July 1940. http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=d25_1346775747

leccy
09-09-2012, 11:13 AM
Light Flak carriages designed to accompany Hitlers and other senior Nazi's trains to provide air defence, these are the two carriages given to Mussolini on 22nd July.

DVX
10-04-2012, 04:03 PM
Light Flak carriages designed to accompany Hitlers and other senior Nazi's trains to provide air defence, these are the two carriages given to Mussolini on 22nd July.

It was the gift of the Fuhrer for the Duce's birthday (28th of July).

Anyone has perhaps the original text in English of this execution of Italian patriots? ( http://www.ww2incolor.com/dramatic/italopalessemartireRSI.html )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_mDUlxtRJM&feature=related

fredl109
10-23-2012, 09:28 AM
Hello to all, to answer Nickdfresh, it is necessary to know that the tank transported here was the M11/39 whose weight didn't pass 9 tons, what explains why those were transported here by truck. For what is PanzerCknaker movies thank you to have them under titled in English, but they are necessary to know that a lot is movies of propagandas and the Luce institute was on the subject a master. Many are reconstitutions made aprés the facts, one sees it very well because of the position of the cameras. But it remained always interesting trés because it permits to make itself an idea on such or such use of the used at the time materials.

Forgiveness but my English being always as bad I use a translator and I hope that my sentences are comprehensible enough for all world.
Friendly Fred

Byron
11-26-2013, 12:40 PM
it is necessary to know that the tank transported here was the M11/39 whose weight didn't pass 9 tons, what explains why those were transported here by truck.

Actually, the tank in the Bir Hacheim newsreel is an M 13/40, not an M 11/39. The Italian tanks were all light enough to transport via truck.

Panzerknacker
03-07-2015, 06:05 PM
This is particular are extracts of 1938 documentary called "Armi della Fanteria", weapons of the infantry, it has 2003 comments (voiceover), aniway all the footage is of pre-war that period, two parts. In this you can see the 7.35mm carcano rifle, but that was rarely used in ww2, most rifles were 6.5mm.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=de8_1425233725

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=398_1425693292

Frankly Dude Really
03-09-2015, 06:55 AM
Maybe they'd shoot the camera crew? :)

Amazing film!
At first I thought it was an enacted film or a training (camera at pretty high elevation, stable no shocks (on tripod)), but then you get to see the first 2 italian victims (and these were not enacted!..still despite close by explosions, camera keeps rolling*)..the attack with the 2 flamethrowers seemed like training (aiming above the ground and not IN the supposed british MG pit) and the advancing two men walk pretty visible above ground, whereas they could throw grenades in the pit from that distance, but then you see a british helmet (with "something" but not a skull) flying in the air and the two british (or italian actors?) laying on the ground with already their tommy helmets covering their faces (and NO breathing and sand washed against their legs = been there a while or sand/ash from artillery shell explosion) .
I have seen nazi propaganda films and british newsreel films in wartime which more clearly showed the reenactment (especially that it doesNOT show your own men "falling" by enemy fire).
If this is reenactment then their quality is 10x better than anything seen before; hence I say real-"ish".

* you would think that Robert Capa is the only or first one to be brave enough to film in the heat of battle, but who or what is to say that no other did the same (but did not last that long and/or his film is not of independent reporter newspaper).
Maybe this filmer was a "noob" from the italian propaganda film academy and thought he can shoot film this way...only to learn soon, that that is not too bright **?
It takes only one or two occasions to learn...but the film IS shot and kept...so you can't discard it as being fully set-up/staged immediately.

** most of veterans underline that most of the time they see no fighting action at-all !! A big fight may occur only 2 miles west of you and get described in history books, but you didnot get anything of it.
So , likewise, the camera man joining the engineers troop (in a small tentative patrol attack on a single MG..therefore no deep incursion, therefore no full gear on their backs) may be in an area without further bullets whizzing through the air than that of the single british MG pit. WHich may have been suppressed by italian fire from elsewhere and manned by not Island Britons or Free French but men from India ?

Panzerknacker
01-19-2016, 11:54 AM
Loading and firing the monster 15 inch triple turrets in the battleship "Littorio"

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=a9f_1445103927&comments=1

Notice the gauge of that conning tower doors....:shock::shock: ...that was a real steel time.

Frankly Dude Really
01-20-2016, 08:19 AM
Loading and firing the monster 15 inch triple turrets in the battleship "Littorio"

.

Awesome Sharp images!

So much automation in the shell handling and firing. Surprising to still see a ship's mate in the gun turret next to the barrel seconds before it gets fired (and no big earcovers?).

And how can they be so casually precise about the angle of attack and elevation ?
speed exactly 30 knots and 25 knots. wind exactly 20 (what ? which direction ?) distance exactly 37 kms to 33 kms.sail angle exactly 20 degrees. elevation exactly 45 degrees.
Wow..those electronic indicators know how to aim at rounded numbers.



at wiki I noticed this on the Littorio:
On 5 February 1947, Italia (=Littorio after armistice in 1943) was finally permitted to return to Italy. In the Treaty of Peace with Italy, signed five days later on 10 February, Italia was allocated as a war prize to the United States.

Why war prize still at that stage and time 1947 ! ?

Panzerknacker
01-20-2016, 08:26 AM
There were several sistem to obtain data, wind numbers was give by anemometers, range is calculated by the Galileo giroscopically stabilized stereoscopical rangefinder, etc, etc, all that was introduced in the big predictor wich was not "Electronic" but electromechanic calculator.

Italians also had Radar but it wasnt very reliable at this stage of the war (1941)

Panzerknacker
01-26-2016, 01:00 AM
Ground strafing with the Macchi mc202 Folgore (Thunderbolt)

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=8f0_1368996469

Panzerknacker
02-05-2016, 10:16 AM
Making Torpedos. 1940.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxsXyUkE5co