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pulpculture
11-01-2011, 09:08 AM
Hi.

I have a WW2 bomb and I am trying to identify it. The history is I was given it by my Granddad. He was stationed in Palestine and possibly Egypt in WW2. It landed near him and didn't go off. It still has the item that looks like a propeller in it. I have always assumed the propeller device needed to spin and release to arm the bomb hence why it didn't go off. I believe he told me it was an Italian bomb. He was responsible for a bomb / munitions store in the region and got one of the bomb disposal guys to defuse it and brought it home with him. I just wondered if anyone recognised it? Appreciate your help.

57255726

Matthew

leccy
11-02-2011, 02:25 AM
TM9-1985-6 Italian and French Explosive Ordnance (http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/ref/TM/pdfs/TM9-1985-6-Italy.pdf)

page 24, Fig 35, it looks like the hollow charge bombs which come in 3.5kg, 5kg, 25kg, 50kg and 100kg sizes. The 3.5kg was according to the manual the only one known to have been manufactured by the Italians.

DVX
11-02-2011, 08:58 PM
Hi.

It landed near him and didn't go off. It still has the item that looks like a propeller in it. I have always assumed the propeller device needed to spin and release to arm the bomb hence why it didn't go off. I believe he told me it was an Italian bomb.

Matthew

Hi Matthew, it was a target indicator, not an explosive bomb. Yes, Italian made.
Here an original report by the US War Department on this weapon, of may 20 1943:

http://www.lonesentry.com/articles/ttt07/target-indicator.html

Chevan
11-03-2011, 02:59 AM
. It landed near him and didn't go off.
Matthew , you are seems very brave man , if holds the real bomb in house.I just hope it will hasn't detonated near you next time.

leccy
11-03-2011, 03:43 AM
5728
Hi Matthew, it was a target indicator, not an explosive bomb. Yes, Italian made.
Here an original report by the US War Department on this weapon, of may 20 1943:

http://www.lonesentry.com/articles/ttt07/target-indicator.html

I looked at the target indicator first but it is not the right shape, the fuse is mounted in the nose not the tail, the fins are wrong. If you look at the link I gave which is to the US Army Technical Manual TM 9-1985-6 from 1953, Italian and French Explosive Ordnance, (which is also USAF Technical Manual TO 39B-1A-8), you will see a picture (Page 24, Figure 35, lower picture) and description of the Hollow Charge Bomb.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]5729

You can compare it to the 5kg Vento Marker you linked to which is on page 21, Figure 30.

5728

Rising Sun*
11-03-2011, 05:51 AM
Matthew , you are seems very brave man , if holds the real bomb in house.I just hope it will hasn't detonated near you next time.

My thoughts also.

Matthew, you really need to get this bomb examined by an expert to make sure it's not a risk to you and others.

DVX
11-03-2011, 06:19 AM
5728

I looked at the target indicator first but it is not the right shape, the fuse is mounted in the nose not the tail, the fins are wrong. If you look at the link I gave which is to the US Army Technical Manual TM 9-1985-6 from 1953, Italian and French Explosive Ordnance, (which is also USAF Technical Manual TO 39B-1A-8), you will see a picture (Page 24, Figure 35, lower picture) and description of the Hollow Charge Bomb.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]5729

You can compare it to the 5kg Vento Marker you linked to which is on page 21, Figure 30.

5728

You're right. Good eye!

pulpculture
11-03-2011, 08:08 AM
That's great info. Many thanks. A target indicator / hollow charge bomb - what would they have used that for? Were they deployed from aircraft in combat or for some sort of training range finding?
Thanks for the comments on safety. I'll keep it somewhere cool just in case.

tankgeezer
11-03-2011, 12:23 PM
Well, It would be a grand idea to have your trophy checked by someone who knows about Odnance disposal, and rendering munitions safe. You have said that the device has been defused, did they go so far as to remove the explosives from it? Removing only the fuse, leaves the shaped charge in place, removing the initiator only leaves the fuse, and charge in place. If it is determined to be completely inert, do what you like with it, (in accordance with the laws of your Nation, and region of course) however, if you have a device still holding its explosive charge, it needs to go to the moors for disposal.
My training, and experience in EOD is not extensive, and certainly not current, but a shaped charge is far more dangerous than a smoke, or flare cartridge.(which are still nothing to sneeze at) and fillings used in those days tend to become very unstable with age. I would recommend strongly that despite its history as a war trophy from your G'Dad, it is much too dangerous to have around, and should go to the local EOD people for checking, and if need be, disposal. Call whoever you need to, and do it today. I've been to a mop up after someone picked up an unexploded device because it didn't go off when it hit ground. (it had just not gone off the FIRST time it hit the ground.) 2 dead, several others injured. Not something you want to come home to.

leccy
11-03-2011, 12:56 PM
That's great info. Many thanks. A target indicator / hollow charge bomb - what would they have used that for? Were they deployed from aircraft in combat or for some sort of training range finding?
Thanks for the comments on safety. I'll keep it somewhere cool just in case.

Hollow charge devices are usually used to punch a hole through something typically armour. The warheads of most hand held AT weapons use variations on the shaped charge. Many of the anti armour bomblet/cluster munitions also use sub-munitions containing shaped/hollow charges.

If you wish some more technical/history reading


ARL-RP-23, A Brief History of Shaped Charge (A Brief History of Shaped Charge)

As has already been said it will be safer to ensure you have an FFE (free from explosives) certificate since the bomb looks to be in one piece. Too many munitions that are knocking around peoples homes have been found to still be either live or contain explosives. We recently had a mortar round (Illuminating) and a 25lb bomb that was used as a door stop removed from a local shops store when it was found they still contained explosive (picked up at the end of WW2 from Davidstow Airfield by the shops previous owner).