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texag57
05-02-2011, 10:27 AM
I am not the veteran, but I have a good friend who is, and I will post his experiences and feeling about his time there, from time to time. I have posted today a couple of his reminisces on a recent post of a picture of Easy Company survivors in Iwo Jima.

skorzeny57
05-02-2011, 12:25 PM
I am not the veteran, but I have a good friend who is, and I will post his experiences and feeling about his time there, from time to time. I have posted today a couple of his reminisces on a recent post of a picture of Easy Company survivors in Iwo Jima.

I think that is a great idea! I've seen the pictures you're talking about and they are beautiful, expecially if you think that they're part of your friend remembrances... I can't wait to read something about him... But, if you want to post something, may you use a little larger font size? I almost need a magnifying glass to read a "2" size font... ;) :)
Thanx for all!

texag57
05-02-2011, 12:40 PM
:)Thanks for your reply, skorzeny 57. I did not meanfor the print to be that small, and totally agree that it was almost impossible to read. I hope to receive information from him in a few days, and will be glad to share.
I think that is a great idea! I've seen the pictures you're talking about and they are beautiful, expecially if you think that they're part of your friend remembrances... I can't wait to read something about him... But, if you want to post something, may you use a little larger font size? I almost need a magnifying glass to read a "2" size font... ;) :)
Thanx for all!

flamethrowerguy
05-02-2011, 03:48 PM
:)Thanks for your reply, skorzeny 57. I did not meanfor the print to be that small, and totally agree that it was almost impossible to read. I hope to receive information from him in a few days, and will be glad to share.

I enlarged the script a bit, hope that helps.

texag57
05-02-2011, 08:15 PM
Thank you very much, flamethrowerguy. That helps a whole lot.:)
I enlarged the script a bit, hope that helps.

jamestallakson
05-04-2011, 03:18 PM
its funny, my cousin was in the Marine Corps and went to Iwo Jima for one of those memorial walk things, and he sent me some volcanic ash from there. it smells like pepper. when something troubles me, i look at that jar of ash and thing of the brave Marines who gave their lives defending our great nation. Semper Fi Marines!

navyson
05-04-2011, 04:11 PM
Yeah, I'd like to hear of his remembrances also. Egorka has a thread of his grandfathers (I think) remembrances of the Eastern Front. You should check it out if you haven't.
Edit: Here's the link:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?6713-Who-is-interested-in-my-granddad-s-memoirs

texag57
05-05-2011, 10:20 AM
As soon as I get the copy of the talk he gives, I'll post a little at a time. When I asked about the climate, this past weekend, he told me about the very cool nights. One of the foxhole he dug was in a sulpher area, which he said was warm, and he thought he had it made at night. However, he said it did not take long before he could feel a "burning" sensation through his clothing and had to abandon that foxhole. I am looking forward to other experiences that I feel he will include in his talk.

Cheers :)
Yeah, I'd like to hear of his remembrances also. Egorka has a thread of his grandfathers (I think) remembrances of the Eastern Front. You should check it out if you haven't.
Edit: Here's the link:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?6713-Who-is-interested-in-my-granddad-s-memoirs

texag57
05-05-2011, 10:22 AM
Thanks for the thread location, navyson. I am going to check it out right now. :army:

muscogeemike
05-09-2011, 08:15 PM
I remember some time back reading somewhere that some US Army personnel were involved in the Iwo Jima landings but have not been able to find any info on this. Does anybody outthere know anything about this? If there were Army guys there, how many and in what capacity?

texag57
05-09-2011, 09:31 PM
:)I found that the 147th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army, landed on Iwo in March of 1945 to garrison the Island. The 147th also did mop up on the island. If there were other Army outfits there, perhaps someone else will fill us in.

texag57
05-10-2011, 04:10 PM
This will be my first installment from my friend, Clyde Jackson, who was a Private, in Fox Company, USMC on Iwo Jima. All the words are his words from a speech he gives to different organizations who request him to visit. Clyde, and his wife now reside in a home in Dallas, Texas.

" Not many people had ever heard of Iwo Jima until the U.S. forces captured the Mariana Islands and Guam, and then built airfields for the long-rance B-29 bomber to strike at the very heart of the Japanese homeland.
There was a problem-the 2600 mile round trip took them directly over Iwo-this they could not easily avoid, because the 29's were almost at their maximum distance, and they needed to fly the shortest and direct route. Iwo would also warn the homeland that the B-29's were on their way.
Another problem- if any of the 29's had engine problems coming or going, or had battle damage and could not make it back to their home base, a crash landing in the water was their only choice, hoping to be rescued by the Navy rather than the Japanese. Therefore, the decision was made to capture Iwo. With Iwo in U.S. hands, the B29's would have a safe place to land, plus the long range P 51 fighters could escort the B-29's on their bombing runs.
Iwo was different from any other island that we captured because it was part of the Japanese Empire, and would be most heavily defended, because a loss of Iwo would be a devastating blow to the morale of the Japanese people and especially to the military high command."

Next: More on the Japanese preparations, as Clyde saw it.

navyson
05-10-2011, 06:55 PM
Cool, keep it up....

texag57
05-10-2011, 08:47 PM
That I will, navyson. :army:

skorzeny57
05-11-2011, 10:17 AM
Good job, Texag57. Very interesting, expecially if you think that these are words from a Iwo Veteran. Thanx to you and to him... :)

texag57
05-11-2011, 10:33 AM
Will do, skorzeny57. I will try to add to it daily, but I may miss a day now and then. I do this after work, and after the honeydo's are finished. Cheers,:army:
Good job, Texag57. Very interesting, expecially if you think that these are words from a Iwo Veteran. Thanx to you and to him... :)

texag57
05-12-2011, 08:38 PM
Installment Two of Clyde Jackson's Iwo Jima Experience.
Japanese Preparations

The choosing of General Tadamichi Kuribayashi as the Commander of Iwo was very wise, for he spoke fluent English and was the Japanese military attache' in Washington in 1928, and had many American friends. He recognized , more than anyone else, the tremendous force that the U.S. would bring against his island.

General Tadamichi Kuribayashi prepared Iwo in the most incredible way with interconnecting tunnels and caves, from one end of the island to the other. This included hundreds of concrete pill boxes, most of which withstand almost any bombing and naval shelling, plus over 900 gun emplacements and thousands of individual fighting positions. Kuribayashi had also trained his 24,000 troops to fight to the death. These facts were attested to by the death of almost 7,000 Marines, and over 18,000 wounded in the 36-day struggle to capture Iwo. After the decision had been made to capture Iwo, the Air Corps started bombing it in December, 1944 and continued until the invasion.

The Invasion task force was made up of more than 500 ships including 8 battleships, 19 cruisers, 44 destroyers, 3 aircraftcarriers, 12 gun boats, 2 hospital ships, 75 troop transports and almost every type ship the Navy had. The task force bombarded Iwo continuously for 62 hours before the landing.

The landing force was made up of the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Marine Divisions, with the 5th landing on the left and the 4th on the right. The 28th Regiment, of which I was a part, landed on the extreme left, with their objective being to cut the island in two and then capture Mt. Suribache, the 550 foot high extinct volcano which dominated the entire island. The battleship Texas was firing their fourteen batteries over our landing craft as we headed for the beach. The muzzle blast was so great its seems as though our landing craft was being lifted out of the water.

Next: Hitting the Beach

skorzeny57
05-13-2011, 10:33 AM
I heard the story of Iwo Jima landing, hundreds of times from books, images, captions, documentaries, movies... I think that this one is a different way, but the emotion is the same... Thanx, Texag57.

texag57
05-13-2011, 11:08 AM
You can imagine how honored and fortunate I feel to actually be friends with talk with Clyde, a real veteran of that fight, and other invasions. He went on to be a very successful architect and family man.
I heard the story of Iwo Jima landing, hundreds of times from books, images, captions, documentaries, movies... I think that this one is a different way, but the emotion is the same... Thanx, Texag57.

texag57
05-14-2011, 07:19 PM
Episode 3: Hitting the Beach

Our 1st Battalion was the first to land in our sector, with my battalion, the 2nd, landing directly behind the 1st.

General Kuribayashi had decided not to directly defend the beach, because of heavy pre-assault bombardment, but as soon as the 1st Battalion had started moving inland, and the 2nd Battalion had landed on the beach, all hell broke loose. The General now had what he wanted, a very large mass of Marines all grouped together up and down the length of the beach. He pounded us with everything they had, not only from
the ground in front of us, but with every mortar, artillery (piece), and machine gun-pouring down on us from Mt. Surabachi.

The beach was made up of black, volcanic sand, and because of the wave action there was a series of steep terraces. We bogged down into the sand over our ankles, which made it very difficult to climb the terraces. It was two steps up and one backward. Of course, the Japanese had all of their weapons zeroed in on the terraces. The noise of the exploding shells was overwhelming. I don't know how we ever survived the beach landing.

After finally struggling up off the beach, I looked down, and it seemed as if the beach was covered--completely covered--with bodies, body parts, and wrecked equipment. I also saw Japanese artillery strike several incoming landing craft which seemed to completely disappear when struck.

The first day was very confusing, as our troops scattered everywhere, but trying to get units together and organized, and then to make contact with our 1st Battalion, which had succeeded in crossing the island, but with a great number of troops killed and wounded, was difficult. After we joined up with the 1st Battalion, we pivoted and started our attack on Suribachi

Next Episode of Clyde Jackson's experiences: Mt Suribachi.

DVX
05-15-2011, 09:03 AM
Thank you Texag57, great idea... Let me suggest to put at least also here the pictures, so that they could to come along the text, the veteran's memory.

texag57
05-15-2011, 12:53 PM
:)Thank you for the suggestion, DVX. I had thought about that, but was not sure about how to do it. I'll experiment a little to find the way. :army:
Thank you Texag57, great idea... Let me suggest to put at least also here the pictures, so that they could to come along the text, the veteran's memory.

skorzeny57
05-15-2011, 01:18 PM
It would be amazing to post some original pics made after the landing by Mr. Clyde Jackson or by some of his mate, but they weren't probably in the right mood to shoot pictures, after the hell they had to face... It would be nice, but i have the feeling that we're asking too much... His availability to share his remembrances wit us, is more than enough...;) Thanx again.

texag57
05-15-2011, 03:32 PM
I really doubt that he has any personal photos, but later he will mention about being nearby when someone else took a picture, but he was not in it. Remember, his battalion's objective was Mt. Surabachi.I will inquire of him if he has any photo's, however. I do have a photo of another U.S. Marine friend, who has now passed away. He was on Okinawa, where he was heading a demolition team. He had some experiences he shared with me, but I do not have them written down, unfortunately.:(
It would be amazing to post some original pics made after the landing by Mr. Clyde Jackson or by some of his mate, but they weren't probably in the right mood to shoot pictures, after the hell they had to face... It would be nice, but i have the feeling that we're asking too much... His availability to share his remembrances wit us, is more than enough...;) Thanx again.

texag57
05-17-2011, 08:15 PM
Episode 4: The approach to Mt. Surabachi.

The first day and night were very critical as we had to make sure we were well organized to withstand a banzai attack, which never came in full force. I later learned the General Kuirbayashi did not believe in expending his troops in such a manner. The Navy did a great job every night by firing star shells and parachute flares so we (could) observe any movement by the Japanese.

The second, third and fourth days all seem to run together in my memory. The same thing every day, attacking pillboxes, caves and tunnels all the while being pounded by gunfire pouring down on us from Suribachi. We thought it would never end.

But, there is always one memory that stands out. Prior to night falling on the second day, a defense line was established , and our company, Co. F, had the defense from the water line inland. Two other men and I were digging a foxhole when I struck something metallic-I knew it was a land mine, but all I could think was, "Damn! We'll have to start a new foxhole". I slipped my hand under the mine to see if it had a trip wire. It had none, so I picked it up gently and placed it about 6 yards behind us. I never told the other men until later that night. I've done some dumb things, but this was the dumbest. Dumb was not one of the words my buddies used when I told them what I had done.

Again, we had no banzai attack, but we had a terrific 240 mm. mortar attack along our line, starting in front of us and marching all the way down to the landing beach.

One of the men with me suffered a very painful shoulder wound-we did what we could to help him, and we were able to get him evacuated before we starting pushing forward that morning. I felt sorry for the troops, especially the wounded that were caught in the mortar attack on the landing beach that night because many of the wounded who were waiting to be evacuated were wounded again or killed. Much equipment and supplies were destroyed.

By the end of the 4th day we had reached the base of the mountain and surrounded all sides just prior to nightfall, except where the mountain ran directly into the ocean. We were still encountering pillboxes and caves, but at least the mortars and artillery could not reach us.

Next: Assault on Suribachi.

colmhain
05-19-2011, 06:01 AM
Thank you, texag57. And please pass on my gratitude to your friends. This is exactly why I love this forum!:D

texag57
05-19-2011, 09:30 AM
:)I appreciate your note, colmhain. All credit goes to Clyde Jackson, who wrote this up as a talk to different organizations, and was nice enough to give me a copy to share. More to come.
Thank you, texag57. And please pass on my gratitude to your friends. This is exactly why I love this forum!:D

rudeerude
05-19-2011, 02:07 PM
Episode 3: Hitting the Beach

Our 1st Battalion was the first to land in our sector, with my battalion, the 2nd, landing directly behind the 1st.

General Kuribayashi had decided not to directly defend the beach, because of heavy pre-assault bombardment, but as soon as the 1st Battalion had started moving inland, and the 2nd Battalion had landed on the beach, all hell broke loose. The General now had what he wanted, a very large mass of Marines all grouped together up and down the length of the beach. He pounded us with everything they had, not only from
the ground in front of us, but with every mortar, artillery (piece), and machine gun-pouring down on us from Mt. Surabachi.

The beach was made up of black, volcanic sand, and because of the wave action there was a series of steep terraces. We bogged down into the sand over our ankles, which made it very difficult to climb the terraces. It was two steps up and one backward. Of course, the Japanese had all of their weapons zeroed in on the terraces. The noise of the exploding shells was overwhelming. I don't know how we ever survived the beach landing.

After finally struggling up off the beach, I looked down, and it seemed as if the beach was covered--completely covered--with bodies, body parts, and wrecked equipment. I also saw Japanese artillery strike several incoming landing craft which seemed to completely disappear when struck.

The first day was very confusing, as our troops scattered everywhere, but trying to get units together and organized, and then to make contact with our 1st Battalion, which had succeeded in crossing the island, but with a great number of troops killed and wounded, was difficult. After we joined up with the 1st Battalion, we pivoted and started our attack on Suribachi

Next Episode of Clyde Jackson's experiences: Mt Suribachi.

A map showing the landings of the 1st and 2nd battalions lower left.I thought this might give the reader a visualization of the path Clyde would be taking during the battle.

5479

texag57
05-19-2011, 02:47 PM
:DThanks so very much rudeerude. Can you coach me on how to add pictures and maps? I see the tool for "image" but do not know how to use it. Thanks , again for the map.
A map showing the landings of the 1st and 2nd battalions lower left.I thought this might give the reader a visualization of the path Clyde would be taking during the battle.

5479

texag57
05-19-2011, 04:03 PM
Episode 5: Mt. Suribachi

Again we set up our defense for the night, expecting an attack, but no serious attack came, but there was fighting all night.

The morning of the 5th day was almost totally quiet, except for the fighting at the other end of the island. A patrol was ordered to climb Suribachi, and my squad leader and 3 other men climbed to the top and returned, reporting seeing only dead Japanese. A 40-man patrol from E company was ordered up Suribachi carrying the first flag that was raised-the entire battalion followed, and when I reached the top, what an incredible sight it was to see the entire island. It made me realize how important it was to capture Suribachi. Because the first flag was so small, a much larger flag was brought up, and I was standing about 6 feet from Joe Rosenthal when he took his famous picture of the 2nd flag being raised. It was great to see the flag, but all I could think of was that I was alive. (Clyde told me personally about three weeks ago, when we were together, that if he had known how famous that picture would be, he would have run over to help the guys raise it!) Who would have ever guessed what an Icon that picture would become?

We later found out that most of the Japanese on Suribachi had either committed suicide; filtered through our lines during the night, or escaped through the tunnel system to the north end of the island to fight again.

We spent the night on top of Suribachi and then spent the next two days rearming, resting, and blowing up tunnels and caves we had bypassed earlier when pressing the attack on Suribachi.

We thought we were through fighting, because we had achieved our objective, but a strange thing happened. We started getting replacement troops-our first clue we weren't going anywhere but north.

Next episode: The Fight in the North End of Iwo Jima:neutral:

skorzeny57
05-19-2011, 05:44 PM
Hi Texag57,
thanx again for your friend Clyde's story. I've seen in your previous post that you asked some help about how to include pics and maps in your posts...

5481

If you allow me to give a little help i'm going to explane to you how i posted the picture above, just like an example, step by step... First of all i saved the pic of the "US Flag raisin" on my PC Desktop with the name "Iwo Jima". After you wrote your message you have to make a click on the ATTACHMENTS icon (center-top). In the box that appears, make another click on ADD FILES icon. After this make another click on SELECT FILES. It'll appears a new box related to your PC. Select DESKTOP (where the picture's been saved) and then select IWO JIMA. After this, select OPEN and then UPLOAD FILES. Just wait few seconds and you'll see your picture in the low left corner. Select DONE and the play's done... Now you can see your post with the picture you selected...

texag57
05-19-2011, 07:07 PM
Thanks very much for your help. I have printed the information you sent me, and I will give that a try a little later this evening. I am going to try to get Clyde to get on this site. He is now 85 and very sharp, so he might give it a go. I'll let him know that several of the members are enjoying his Iwo Jima adventure.:army:

rudeerude
05-19-2011, 08:08 PM
Episode 5: Mt. Suribachi

Again we set up our defense for the night, expecting an attack, but no serious attack came, but there was fighting all night.

The morning of the 5th day was almost totally quiet, except for the fighting at the other end of the island. A patrol was ordered to climb Suribachi, and my squad leader and 3 other men climbed to the top and returned, reporting seeing only dead Japanese. A 40-man patrol from E company was ordered up Suribachi carrying the first flag that was raised-the entire battalion followed, and when I reached the top, what an incredible sight it was to see the entire island. It made me realize how important it was to capture Suribachi. Because the first flag was so small, a much larger flag was brought up, and I was standing about 6 feet from Joe Rosenthal when he took his famous picture of the 2nd flag being raised. It was great to see the flag, but all I could think of was that I was alive. (Clyde told me personally about three weeks ago, when we were together, that if he had known how famous that picture would be, he would have run over to help the guys raise it!) Who would have ever guessed what an Icon that picture would become?

We later found out that most of the Japanese on Suribachi had either committed suicide; filtered through our lines during the night, or escaped through the tunnel system to the north end of the island to fight again.

We spent the night on top of Suribachi and then spent the next two days rearming, resting, and blowing up tunnels and caves we had bypassed earlier when pressing the attack on Suribachi.

We thought we were through fighting, because we had achieved our objective, but a strange thing happened. We started getting replacement troops-our first clue we weren't going anywhere but north.

Next episode: The Fight in the North End of Iwo Jima:neutral:


E Company taking the first flag up Mt.Suribachi

5483

A map showing the progress of the Marines D-day +5 it also shows the 28th regiment.

5482

rudeerude
05-19-2011, 08:16 PM
:DThanks so very much rudeerude. Can you coach me on how to add pictures and maps? I see the tool for "image" but do not know how to use it. Thanks , again for the map.

Your welcome texag57 ;).I have been enjoying this thread very much with the reading's

texag57
05-19-2011, 08:27 PM
That is so cool to have the pictures to go with Clyde's story. Thanks very much.:D

texag57
05-21-2011, 06:37 PM
5485As it turned out, capturing Suribachi was was almost mild by comparison to the horrors that awaited us at the north end. The north end was completely covered with cliffs, valleys, ridges, crags, pillboxes, and caves, all to be defended to the death, theirs or ours.

There is not enough time to tell about all of the fighting our regiment encountered, but let me give you an example.

One of the most fortified areas on Iwo Jima was Hill 362A and Nishi Ridge. Our sister regiment had been attacking these two strong points and had incurred so many casualties that they had to be relieved, and the 28th took their position. Now Hill 362A was not really a hill but an eighty foot cliff completely interlaced with caves and tunnels, all fitted out with machine guns, mortars, and artillery. Two hundred fifty yards to the north was Nishi Ridge, equally heavily defended. Our 1st Battalion attacked the cliff, and our 3rd Battalion attacked the ridge. Our 2nd Battalion attacked the field in between. The other two battalions probably had the most difficult positions, but our battalion was caught in a cross fire from both the cliff and the ridge.

We lost 96 men in the first 5 hours of fighting. The fight raged on for another three days and nights before we captured both positions. One of my most vivid memories I had of the first day was when I was running next to my squad leader when he was wounded. As he was falling, I grabbed him and pulled him down into a very large shell hole, probably made by one of our battleships. I opened his dungaree top and I could see the hole in the side of his chest. The only thing I could do was pour sulfa on it and put a patch over it. The Japanese knew where we were and would fire mortars at us when they did not have another target. One mortar shell hit the upper rim of the shell hole we were in, burying itself in the soft sand before exploding with all the force going up, but covering (us) with sand. The battle continued until late afternoon when things quieted down enough so we could remove all of our wounded and reclaim our dead. I didn't see my squad leader for fifty years and when we did meet the first thing he asked was did I remember what I said to him when he was wounded. I did not. He quoted me, " you are going to be OK, Sherman---I think"!!

Episode 7: The Battle Ends/The Role of the Navy

skorzeny57
05-22-2011, 12:38 PM
Good job, Texag57!!! Nice to hear that Sherman survived the war, too... :)
Nice story, thanx again!

rudeerude
05-22-2011, 04:23 PM
Another good short read texag57.I will be looking forward to the next episode and hopefully many more.Good to see you have the photo situation figured out.A perfect example to go with the story.

texag57
05-22-2011, 06:00 PM
:D That was good news about Sherman, wasn't it. I was glad to see that in Clyde's notes as well. Clyde did a great job in writing his story. I will try to get more, if possible. He and I live in two different parts of Texas, but I hope to visit him again. His being in the 4th Marines means he fought at other islands in the War.
Good job, Texag57!!! Nice to hear that Sherman survived the war, too... :)
Nice story, thanx again!

texag57
05-22-2011, 06:10 PM
Thanks, rudeerude, it took me awhile, but I think I finally have the hang of posting pictures. I know that Clyde fought at other islands in the Pacific, and I will see if he wishes to write any more of his experiences. I did have another good friend at our church in Houston that was in the 2nd Marines, but he passed away recently. He had been at Tarawa and Okinawa, just to name a couple of places he fought. He was head of a demolition crew that had to blast the Japanese out of their caves, or seal them in.
Another good short read texag57.I will be looking forward to the next episode and hopefully many more.Good to see you have the photo situation figured out.A perfect example to go with the story.

texag57
05-23-2011, 09:19 PM
Time got away from me today. More on Clyde Jackson on Iwo Jima tomorrow.:(

texag57
05-24-2011, 09:37 PM
Episode 7: Fighting on Iwo Jima Ends/U.S. Navy Contributions

Because our company had sustained so many casualties, we had to be pulled off of the front line. To illustrate how bad the situation was, our platoon was now being run by me and another Private First Class. We had no other of higher rank of experience in our platoon. After resting, rearming and receiving new replacements, we spent the next 24 hours integrating the new replacements into our platoon. We then returned to the fighting on the front lines, and I was wounded on March 12th.

By now the Japanese had been compressed into a very small area in the north part of the island, but because the area was so incredibly rugged and heavily fortified, it took the remnants of 4 regiments and 2 battalions 14 days to finish the battle. Just our regiment alone in that 14 days lost 140 killed and 388 wounded. Our regiment landed with 3,250 men and left with 300. Our company landed with 250 men and left with 7. The Battle for Iwo Jima was officially declared over on March 26, 1945.(66 years ago in 2011)
There have been very few things mentioned about the Navy losses at Iwo Jima, but a total of 27 fighting ships were damaged by Japanese fire, with a loss of 423 killed and 489 wounded. The aircraft carrier Bismark Sea was sunk with 127 killed and many wounded. The aircraft cattier Saratoga was so heavily damaged it was put out of action, with a loss of 123 killed and 192 wounded.

Episode 8: More on the U.S. Navy/Begin Clyde Jackson's article, "Oh Happy Day".

skorzeny57
05-25-2011, 10:28 AM
I can't even think which kind of feelings were rumbling in the head of one of those seven survivors from E Company, after that hell... I can't find the right world in my language, you can imagine in English... :shock: :(
Thanx again, Texag57!!!

texag57
05-25-2011, 11:35 AM
I have no words, either. It would be shocking, devastating, and so very, very sad. There is no way to repay their sacrifice.:(

texag57
05-29-2011, 01:35 PM
Episode 8:More about the work of the U.S. Navy

Many Navy personnel that brought the troops and materials ashore and retrieved the were wounded were also killed or wounded. Many Navy medical personnel that manned our battalion and regimental aid stations were killed and wounded including 7 Navy doctors killed. Navy Construction Battalion troops that cleared the landing strips so that damaged B-29's could land were also killed or wounded. Now some of you might not know that there are two Navy Corpsmen are assigned to each Marine Infantry platoon. They have to do everything we do plus take care of us. The Navy Medical Corpsmen attached to the Marines suffered heavy losses. 195 killed and 529 wounded. Their casualty rate, percentage wise, was even greater than the Marines. Every Marine's hero are these medical corpsmen!! There were many other unsung Navy heroes that were killed or wounded in the battle for Iwo Jima. :(

Episode 9: Clyde Jackson's Personal Article, "OH HAPPY DAY'

texag57
05-30-2011, 02:13 PM
"OH HAPPY DAY" BY CLYDE JACKSON

TOMORROW, I was going to be killed. TOMORROW I was going to die and there was nothing I could do about it. I couldn't run, I couldn't hide, I couldn't think of any way to keep it from happening.

Even though 200 men in our Marine infantry company of 236 on Iwo Jima had already been killed or wounded, I had never before had that dread feeling that I was going to die. After all, I was barely 19 years old and invincible; but all of that had changed this morning. I knew that TOMORROW I would be killed.

After 20 days of almost constant fighting day and night, I was dirty, hungry, and exhausted-a state that didn't help my attitude about dying. Nights were the worst. In the darkness of this small eight-mile long, three-and -a-half mile wide island, with its rugged landscape, the imagination ran ahead of reality, seeing the enemy in every movement and shadow on its crags, cliffs, ridges, and valleys.

For the last two days our platoon had been out blowing up caves and tunnels previously bypassed as we tried to force the Japanese into the upper part of the island. This morning as we joined our company, the first person I saw was Sergeant Jay Brandt, all 220 pounds of him, with his undershorts down around his knees, picking grenade shrapnel out of his buttocks and legs. When I asked how things were going, he replied that they had just finished a fierce firefight that had ended in a stand-off. He also said that the Japanese now outnumbered us, at least in our own sector of the island, as we continued to compress them into a smaller and smaller area. My apprehension about TOMORROW grew!

Our platoon managed to move in and integrate with the remainder of the company, which by now comprised only about 35 of the original men and 30 recent replacements. About noon, another attempt was made to push forward, but the Japanese firing was so heavy that we did not make any headway. Several men were wounded and the man next (to) me, a new replacement, was shot through the forehead. I couldn't even remember his name, but I did remember his saying that he had a wife and three children.

As the day progressed, there was more firing from both sides, and my concern about TOMORROW became greater. Late in the afternoon, two men from the rear brought us a small garbage can full of hot coffee, and I volunteered to get some for the two men with whom I was sharing a foxhole.

Next Posting: The Conclusion of Clyde Jackson's fight on Iwo Jima.

texag57
06-03-2011, 03:40 PM
Conclusion of Clyde Jackson's combat on Iwo Jima

The Japanese must have detected our movement, because they began shelling us with mortars, wounding two men nearby. Then I felt the most terrific pain I had ever experienced. A mortar shell, which turned out to be a dud, hit me in the arm,driving bone through to the other side. Through tears and the pain, however, I realized that although my wound was painful, it was not life threatening, and I began to smile and smile. Now I was wounded and would not have to worry about TOMORROW.

The medical corpsman crawled over to see if he could help. I asked for a shot of morphine to ease the pain, but he had just given his last one to someone else. I told him that was OK with me, because I just wanted to get off the front line along with the other wounded. That's when he told me the bad news: it was not going to happen, because there were Japanese snipers on the trail back to the rear. When I realized that meant I would have to spend the night on the front line, my smile faded and my fear of TOMORROW came rushing back. Not only could I not forestall TOMORROW, but now I was disabled and unable to fully protect myself. With help,I managed to return to the foxhole and the protection of my two friends.

Needless to say, I didn't get any sleep because of the pain and thinking about TOMORROW. There was only sporadic firing by both sides during the night, but no real attacks. As soon as it was light, I sought out the corpsman, and to my great relief he was able to evacuate me and the other wounded men. I was taken to a battalion aid station, where I was given anesthesia while the doctor performed a partial repair of my wound.

I did not awake until the following morning as I was being carried on a stretcher to an awaiting plane bound for a hospital in Guam. I looked up at the blue sky and then I realized that TOMORROW was yesterday and I was still alive. O beautiful day!

O wonderful day!

O happy day!(30)

skorzeny57
06-03-2011, 04:12 PM
Thanx again for his precious remembrance to the US Marine Veteran Clyde Jackson and to our good friends Texag57, for his precious help...

texag57
06-03-2011, 05:51 PM
I am privileged to know Clyde Jackson, and honored to share his wartime experience on Iwo Jima. If you met him, you would not expect him to be a combat veteran. He is quiet, unassuming, and a very gentle man, as I am sure other surviving veterans from other nations who fought on both sides in that war.

bltjr1951
06-18-2011, 08:26 PM
My great uncle was on Iwo, never talked about it to family.
Sometimes he let slip some jewel, the Thompson SMG was great for fire fight till it jammed and you picked up a Garand to continue fighting. My dad told me he said that after some WW2 movie on tv?
I asked him if he was at Iwo and he told me: "yes I was, we cleared the caves from japs, they would hide in holes and shoot you in the back after you walked by". This was a few months before he died.
When I read about him in paper was when I found out he won Bronze Star for Valor.

texag57
06-20-2011, 11:06 AM
I have another friend from our church, who passed away recently, who was in charge of a Marine demolitions unit. His job was to seal the caves, or blast the Japanese soldiers out. He was not at Iwo Jima, but did his work at Tarawa and Okinawa, among other places. [[B]His name was "Dutch" Raitz. I do miss him, for he was a very quiet and humble man, and a good friend.B][/

dwesol
06-27-2011, 11:10 PM
What a great thread. Thanks for sharing. My Uncle, Pvt. Lawrence J. Ryan was also assigned to F Company, 2nd Battalion, 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division. He died in July, 2004. Too soon. He too was wounded after Suribachi. He said he could not get flat enough on the ground as a Jap machine gun opened up. A MG round struck him in the top of the shoulder, and exited at the bottom of his shoulder blade.

Shortly before his death, as he reflected on Iwo, he said "life was cheap back then", as he remebered how many of his fellow Marines were killed there.
Thank you Clyde Jackson!

texag57
07-04-2011, 04:44 PM
dwesol,
We have been in Colorado for several days, and I wanted to let you know that I will contact Clyde to see if he remembers your relative. I will let you know as soon as I hear back.

Cheers

texag57
07-05-2011, 05:17 PM
dwesol,

Clyde Jackson said your uncle was in his same 10 man squad. He would like to get in touch with you, so I will get his email and send it to you. Small World.

texag57
07-05-2011, 10:06 PM
[I]dwesol,

Clyde Jackson's email address is twojacksons@sbcglobal.net. He would like to hear from you. Let me know if you two made contact./I]

texag57
08-07-2011, 01:51 PM
BOOT CAMP

As I stepped off of the train
I knew I had made a terrible Mistake
The sergeant was shouting at me
You stupid dumbass
You lowest of the low
Get in the line and follow me

The next day
Lining up to get our new uniforms
Being issues 38-inch dungarees
For my 24-inch size waist

Being humiliated by the sergeant
Since he had to hold up my dungarees
By the belt loops
Because every time I let go
To hoist my sea bag
My dungarees fell down
There we were marching dow the street
With the sergeant holding up my dungarees

Finally getting my web belt and buckle put together
Now cinched around my 24-inch waist
Holding up my 38-inch dungarees
Now I could march with humble pride
What an ignoble start to my Marine Corps career

November, 2010 Clyde Jackson

(Prose written by Clyde Jackson many years after World War II)

Onetimeboot
08-14-2011, 10:27 AM
For one official-source naming of the Army units on Iwo Jima during the battle and i the mopping-up stage, see William S. Bartley, Iwo Jima: Amphibious Epic, Historical Branch, G-3 Division, HQ U.S. Marine Corps, 1954.

Onetiomeboot

Onetimeboot
08-14-2011, 10:54 AM
Appendix V of Iwo Jima: Amphibious Epic, lists the units (Army, Navy and Marine) that comprised the Expeditionary Troops. Under "Garrison Forces (Assault Echelon)," is listed a number of units, including "Detachment, 147th Army Infantry Regiment," that, according to the book, landed on 27 February. The remainder of the regiment came ashore later than that.

Onetimeboot

texag57
08-14-2011, 04:00 PM
Thanks, Onetimeboot, I'll try to find the reference and do some more reading.

Best Regards

USSMakinIslandPilotFamily
12-28-2011, 05:05 PM
Great story from one of our great veterans. Thanks

My grandfather flew with the VC-84 squadron on the escort carrier USS Makin Island during the Iwo Jima campaign. The USS Makin Island was in positioned off of Iwo Jima on February 15th and departed the combat area on March 8th. Then the ship headed to Ulthi.

texag57
12-28-2011, 06:56 PM
It is my privilege to personally know Clyde Jackson. Clyde lives in the Dallas area, and I am in College Station, Texas. We met at the church we both attended for many years in Houston, Texas, when that city was our home. We have been seeing each other each year at a Sunday School retreat in the Texas Hill Country near Leakey (pronounced "lakey") Texas. If you would like to contact Clyde, I have his email address if you would like it. My "civilian" email is texag57@gmail.com.

rfeuillejr
06-11-2012, 10:07 AM
I remember some time back reading somewhere that some US Army personnel were involved in the Iwo Jima landings but have not been able to find any info on this. Does anybody outthere know anything about this? If there were Army guys there, how many and in what capacity?

My father was the exec of the 386 Air Service Group. As the battle was expected to be short, they were sent in on D+5, if I recall. A small advance group was sent in first, my dad among them. This group was on the beach in the middle of the first days fighting on the beach. They were followed a day or two later by the rest of the 386th. They were there to service the P51s and B29s that were expected to be using the airfields there. Needless to say, they were on Iwo for almost all of the fighting.

He told me that the fighting continued on for some time after the island was declared secure. He also told me that his life was saved by marines on two different occasions. In each case, a Japanese soldier had him in his sights at a few feet and the marine involved, in each case, 'put a bullet through the Jap's head.' One of those times, he was carrying a wounded marine and had no ability to defend himself and the other the Japanese fellow got the drop on him, behind American lines, as he was checking on his men after dark. Needless to say, he is very grateful for the marines.

Since this is my first post, I can't post the link, but you can search 386thasg

muscogeemike
06-11-2012, 02:54 PM
Thanks for the info, rfeuillejr, I knew I had seen somewhere that there were a few Army guys there early on.

rfeuillejr
06-11-2012, 03:34 PM
He's still alive (92) but his memory is fading. I will be seeing him in 2 weeks if you have any other questions.

texag57
06-19-2012, 09:33 PM
God Bless him for his service to the United States.

rfeuillejr
06-19-2012, 09:56 PM
I'll pass that along.

By the way, a few years ago, a Marine colonel that had made his acquaintance, found out the Dad had refused a medal awarded him on Iwo. This colonel harassed Dad into accepting it. Dad felt he hadn't been killed and so, didn't deserve a medal. When a Marine interceded, Dad finally accepted it. I have no idea what it was. I guess I should find out.