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View Full Version : Who has served in the military? And when?



Rising Sun*
02-21-2011, 06:56 AM
Seems to me that that there's a lot of people on this site who have served in various capacities and often many years ago, but also with a strong element more recently.

It would be interesting to see that service shown in a poll.

skorzeny57
02-21-2011, 02:18 PM
Congratulations, Rising Sun*!
I think that is a great idea to start a thread about such an interesting topic. As far i as concerned, when i was in the Army (1977/1978), for my Country it was peace time. So the only war i served it was (and still it is) the long war of my everyday life... It's a kind of tough struggle that started about fiftythree years ago and isn't yet over... ;)
Best regards to all the boys that will post in this thread... :army:

Churchill
02-21-2011, 03:23 PM
Just going to say, where are Gulf Wars 2-10? :D

leccy
02-21-2011, 06:32 PM
Well between 1983 (not old enough to actually deploy until 1985 though) and 2007 I managed NI once, FRY 3 times, Iraq twice, Afghan once.

Sapper throughout.

tankgeezer
02-21-2011, 10:19 PM
Just going to say, where are Gulf Wars 2-10? :D

they'll be along in time for you to go over.:shock:

Rising Sun*
02-22-2011, 04:55 AM
For clarification, the poll isn't limited to people who were on active service in the wars listed but who served during those eras. This includes reserves / Territorials etc and other forces which could have been deployed, even if they weren't.

Rising Sun*
02-22-2011, 04:58 AM
Well between 1983 (not old enough to actually deploy until 1985 though) and 2007 I managed NI once, FRY 3 times, Iraq twice, Afghan once.

Sapper throughout.

I think you're responsible for four out of the five eras voted on so far.

Rising Sun*
02-22-2011, 05:02 AM
they'll be along in time for you to go over.:shock:

Yes, and the way things are going in Arabia and its environs lately, it'll be sooner rather than later.

Iron Yeoman
02-28-2011, 07:01 AM
No option for those who are still serving, mostly in the twenty20 club and spar/mace/naafi shop - it's thanks to the sacrifice of many of our waistlines that those shops are still in business.

Rising Sun*
02-28-2011, 07:15 AM
No option for those who are still serving, mostly in the twenty20 club and spar/mace/naafi shop - it's thanks to the sacrifice of many of our waistlines that those shops are still in business.

I apologise for omitting that option.

I suppose it's in the nature of an interest in military history that I look to the past. :(

There doesn't appear to be any way of inserting a currently serving option in the poll, but anyone who is currently serving is encouraged to post even if my focus on the past has unfortunately excluded them from the present in the poll.

Iron Yeoman
02-28-2011, 02:31 PM
I apologise for omitting that option.

I suppose it's in the nature of an interest in military history that I look to the past. :(

There doesn't appear to be any way of inserting a currently serving option in the poll, but anyone who is currently serving is encouraged to post even if my focus on the past has unfortunately excluded them from the present in the poll.

Er well that's me I suppose, defending UK interests, but only on weekends :)

Rising Sun*
02-28-2011, 04:47 PM
Er well that's me I suppose, defending UK interests, but only on weekends :)

You might be in the thick of it. Japan started the Pacific War on a weekend.

Iron Yeoman
02-28-2011, 05:10 PM
You might be in the thick of it. Japan started the Pacific War on a weekend.

Jolly well hope not, if a war kicks off on the weekend I might miss countryfile, and that won't do!

Laconia
02-28-2011, 08:05 PM
I served during what is know as the "Vietnam Era", in the USAF, 1974 to 1978. I was an Aircraft Avionics technician, primarily radios with some navigation systems thrown in. I started out working on the venerable B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers. (SAC) Then I went to a squadron equipped with the C-130 aircraft, configured as an Airborne Command Post. (7th ACCS) My final stint was working on F-4 Phantoms. (TAC) Most of my time in the service was spent overseas in the Pacific area. My duty stations included Thailand and Okinawa, with TDY (temporay duty) in the Philippines and Korea. I had a great time and am proud to have served my country.

Uyraell
03-02-2011, 12:42 AM
"C-130 aircraft, configured as an Airborne Command Post. (7th ACCS)"
MC 130, "Combat Talons" ? if my recall is correct, Laconia?
I've always considered the airborne command post variant of the c-130 to be one of the more interesting, along with the Ac-130H and U.

I'd be interested to learn more of those variants.

Kind and Respectful Regards Laconia, Uyraell.

muscogeemike
03-05-2011, 10:47 AM
I served in the US ARMY from 1966 (as a draftee) to retirement in 1991. I spent the first 11 years (including a tour in Viet Nam) in the Corps of Engineers. In 1977 I went into Special Operations (PSYOPs) and the Military Intelligence field. I remained in this field until retirement at the US ARMY SERGEANTS MAJOR, Ft. Bliss, TX - which is where I started my career (Basic Training) in 1966.

In addition to my VN tour I went to Germany 3 times, Korea twice, and Japan once, i.e. I spent about half my career overseas.

At various stages of my career I held at least 8 Military Occupational Specialties and several additional Skill Identifiers. I even did one involuntary tour as a Recruiter.

Perhaps my most satisfying duty was as First Sergeant of a Military Intel. Company in Korea during the 1988 Olympics.

Ealdwita
03-05-2011, 02:20 PM
I'm afraid I didn't quite know where to put my 'X' on that poll. I was involved in that nasty bit of unpleasantness known as 'Operation Claret' in Indonesia during the 60's along with my merry band of cutthroat Gurkhas of 7RGR, bless 'em! The existance of Claret wasn't made public until 1974, so when the question was asked, "What did you do in the army, dad?" it was a case of "Oh, marched up and down a bit, wrote a few letters!"

muscogeemike
03-05-2011, 08:44 PM
Ealdwita - I had to Google Op. Claret - thank you. Any new history to me is welcome. From what I read you were truly knee deep in the shit.
I remember early one morning on the US Base in Seoul hearing bagpipes. On investigation I found the barracks of the Gurkha detachment and one of these soldiers (in kilts I think) playing the pipes. The British Army and the West in general have been fortunate to have such men serving.

pdf27
03-06-2011, 01:23 AM
TA, 2004-present. Never deployed although several friends have, one was KIA in Afghanistan 18 months ago.

Rising Sun*
03-06-2011, 06:23 AM
I'm afraid I didn't quite know where to put my 'X' on that poll. I was involved in that nasty bit of unpleasantness known as 'Operation Claret' in Indonesia during the 60's along with my merry band of cutthroat Gurkhas of 7RGR, bless 'em! The existance of Claret wasn't made public until 1974, so when the question was asked, "What did you do in the army, dad?" it was a case of "Oh, marched up and down a bit, wrote a few letters!"

Another one of my (increasingly obviously numerous) omissions comes to light. :oops:

I should have thought about things like Konfrontasi as Australian troops were involved. It doesn't really fit into any of the categories I created for the poll.

Then again, other things I didn't think about like the Malayan and Mau Mau emergencies don't really fit either.

Given that I can't edit the poll, I'd suggest that such things fit most nearly into the "Served national wars such as Falklands' category.

Rising Sun*
03-06-2011, 06:31 AM
The British Army and the West in general have been fortunate to have such men serving.

But their service isn't always adequately recognised by the nation which benefits from it. http://www.gurkhajustice.org.uk/

muscogeemike
03-06-2011, 09:10 AM
If you were to list every military incursion of every country your list would be un-manageable. And, as in Ealdwita’s Op. Claret, many are/were classified and may not be listed. Yet still men/women went into harms way and deserve recognition,

Laconia
03-06-2011, 12:44 PM
[QUOTE=Uyraell;175906]"C-130 aircraft, configured as an Airborne Command Post. (7th ACCS)"
MC 130, "Combat Talons" ? if my recall is correct, Laconia?
I've always considered the airborne command post variant of the c-130 to be one of the more interesting, along with the Ac-130H and U.

I'd be interested to learn more of those variants.

I don't know if they are using them anymore. I think the type I worked on was phased out sometime in the 90's. What ours consisted of was a removable capsule that housed the command post part. This slid into the cargo area of the C-130. Inside were the mapboards and crew positions, usually occupied by officers. This "capsule" also contained the comm equipment (radios, and the old fashioned radio teletype equipment) which were behind the map boards. For more info type in ABCCC in a search engine. My old squadron also has a web site. If I was home I'd post some pics, but you can find them on the net. Like I said search ABCCC on the web.

toastmaker
03-31-2011, 01:18 PM
U.S. Army, '70-'71, Nha Trang area, Vietnam. Squad radioman, part-time combat medic assistant. Spent a lot of time trying to keep the S.Koreans based next to us from stealing our med. supplies !! They were good guys but had rather sticky fingers. Early out with some RPG fragments in the back of my thighs (yes, my *** too !) What fun !

muscogeemike
03-31-2011, 01:55 PM
toastmaker - In the late ‘80’s I served with a US NCO who held dual citizenship (ROK and US). He said he had been drafted into the ROK army in the ‘60’s and had served with their Tiger Div in Viet Nam - he told some tall tales of the ROK soldier’s exploits.

toastmaker
04-01-2011, 08:19 AM
We never were in the weeds with them but they were pretty serious grunts - just a bit sneaky and under-supplied.

Rising Sun*
04-01-2011, 08:57 AM
Off the top of my head, I seem to recall that ROK had the second largest foreign troop commitment in Vietnam after the US and that they suffered, in very rough round figures, about ten per cent of the casualties the Americans suffered and about ten times the Australian rate.

But for some reason they don't figure much in most American and Australian, and Vietnamese, histories and certainly not in proportion to their commitment and casualties.

muscogeemike
04-01-2011, 09:47 AM
Also mostly ignored is the ROK’s contribution to there own defense during the Korean War. Koreans, both South and North, were especially valuable behind the lines.
I did two tours with the US Army in the ROK and knew many Korean soldiers serving with us (Korean Augumentee’s to the US Army (KATUSAs)) and ROK soldiers, they are tough, professional, well trained and equipped, and dedicated to the belief that what happened in 1950 will not happen again.

Iron Yeoman
04-01-2011, 10:43 AM
TA, 2004-present. Never deployed although several friends have, one was KIA in Afghanistan 18 months ago.

Pretty much same as you pdf27, joined TA 2003 to present, haven't been deployed yet, sadly lost a friend in Afghanistan four years ago.

gumalangi
01-14-2013, 07:07 PM
I'm afraid I didn't quite know where to put my 'X' on that poll. I was involved in that nasty bit of unpleasantness known as 'Operation Claret' in Indonesia during the 60's along with my merry band of cutthroat Gurkhas of 7RGR, bless 'em! The existance of Claret wasn't made public until 1974, so when the question was asked, "What did you do in the army, dad?" it was a case of "Oh, marched up and down a bit, wrote a few letters!"

Very interesting,

By chances you might spotted my old man, he was CO of so called police's pioneer regiment stationed along the border of indonesia and serawak, he witnessed many indonesians RPKAD returned with one less leg or arm, courtesy of the captor.

Rising Sun*
01-15-2013, 05:55 AM
he witnessed many indonesians RPKAD returned with one less leg or arm, courtesy of the captor.

Do you mean that RPKAD troops had limbs amputated out of battle by the British and or Australian forces?

gumalangi
01-16-2013, 12:40 AM
Do you mean that RPKAD troops had limbs amputated out of battle by the British and or Australian forces?

Yes, they were caught by either British, Austalians or Gurkhas.

Rising Sun*
01-16-2013, 07:36 AM
Yes, they were caught by either British, Austalians or Gurkhas.

I'm willing to accept that anything is possible in war or warlike operations, but this seems unlikely to me.

Were the Indonesians subjected to unskilled amputations in the field by by their enemies, that is by enemy infantry or other fighting soldiers? That seems unlikely to me as the chances of survival are poor under any circumstances without skilled medical care at every step, and more so in tropical jungles.

I have the greatest difficulty in accepting that they were subjected to skilled amputations by British etc medical staff.

gumalangi
01-17-2013, 12:11 PM
Yes, i know it is hard to diggest, but really, most the stories i get from hearsay of my father and his colleagues, however i ever saw one photo somewhere of amputated veteran of RPKAD from that era.

pdf27
01-17-2013, 06:33 PM
Yes, i know it is hard to diggest, but really, most the stories i get from hearsay of my father and his colleagues, however i ever saw one photo somewhere of amputated veteran of RPKAD from that era.Veterans with missing limbs are not a surprise - get hit by a high velocity round or something like a claymore and absent very rapid and skilled medical care losing a limb is highly plausible. Amputating limbs from PoWs for non-medical reasons is a very different kettle of fish - that's an extremely serious war crime, and should be reported to the appropriate authorities (not sure who that would be - maybe start with the Royal Military Police?).