PDA

View Full Version : Hawker Typhoons



Clave
12-06-2010, 01:31 PM
:)

Typhoon Mk 1B of 439 Squadron RCAF 1945.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_Canada_439Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 440 Squadron RCAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_Canada_440Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 56 Squadron RAF 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_56Sqn_1.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 56 Squadron RAF 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_56Sqn_2.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 56 Squadron RAF 1942.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_56Sqn_3.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 168 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_168Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 175 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_175Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 181 Squadron RAF 1942.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_181Sqn.png

Clave
12-06-2010, 01:32 PM
Typhoon Mk 1B of 182 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_182Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 184 Squadron RAF 1945.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_184Sqn_1.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 193 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_193Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 245 Squadron RAF 1945.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_245Sqn_1.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 266 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_266Sqn.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 451 Squadron RAF 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_451Sqn_1.png

Typhoon Mk 1B of 486 Squadron RAF 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/hawker_typhoon/Typhoon_1B_GB_486Sqn.png

Churchill
12-06-2010, 02:09 PM
Nice!

That's the model with the big air scoop for desert warfare isn't it?

Uyraell
12-06-2010, 07:27 PM
Nice!

That's the model with the big air scoop for desert warfare isn't it?

My friend, you're confusing the Spitfires and Hurricanes fitted with either the Abu Seir or Vokes air filters with the Typhoon.

The reason the Typhoon and later Tempest V (which began life as a design entitled "Typhoon II") and later Fury (properly, "Fury II", which began life as a design entitled "Tempest II") have the radiator intake under the nose is the Napier Sabre series engines which powered each. Without going into too much technicality here, various marks and models of Sabre power various models and marks of the airframes I've listed above. In a sort of poetic irony, the only ones of the series to see service in a desert environment were the Sea Fury in Iraq, and the earliest of the Tempest Mk IIs in Pakistan, both of those being (radial, by Bristol) Centaurus-powered. Neither aircraft had been designed with desert service in mind, but both were sold off postwar by a Britain desperate to gain overseas funds, somehow, anyhow.

The last of the Sea Furies was not sold off from Iraq until about 1990, and in fact as late as 1995 or 1996 there were still 3 Sea Furies allegedly rotting away in the open in the corner of a disused airfield just outside Baghdad. These had been seen and photographed by recon teams operating out of Baghram Airbase.

All of which explains why the huge intakes below the Sabre engines should not be confused with either Abu Seir or Vokes "Aerovee" filters.

Clave my friend, as ever : brilliant and beautiful work.
I truly enjoy your magnificent images, and am forever glad to see them.

Warm, Kind, and Respectful Regards my friends, Uyraell.

Churchill
12-06-2010, 08:26 PM
Ah... Thanks for explaining it to me.

Nickdfresh
12-06-2010, 08:48 PM
Love the Typhoon. Both rugged looking and beautiful at the same time...

Uyraell
12-06-2010, 09:38 PM
The Typhoon family was probably the last expression of successful piston-engined airframe development in the UK, in much the same ways as the Corsair II (the Jet-engined Corsair A7 of the Viet Nam era should properly be called Corsair III) FG2 and Thunderbolt J and P51H and P82 are the last expressions of the same in the USA.

There is a certain refined yet brutish functional beauty to each airframe, such that I doubt such syntheses will ever again recur.

I'm in agreement with you Nick my friend, the Typhoon is certainly a rugged beauty.
Roland Beaumont certainly enjoyed flying the Typhoon. Other pilot accounts I have read express the same enjoyment.

Churchill my friend, you're very welcome. :)

rudeerude
12-06-2010, 10:54 PM
Note the Typoon was the first to come out with the recognitions bands way before D-Day.

Uyraell
12-06-2010, 11:09 PM
Yes, correct.
But that is because stripeless Typhoons were being shot at by both Anti-Aircraft guns and other non-Typhoon aircraft, whose crews seemed to insist that the Typhoon was somehow an FW190 variant, despite the disparity in size and markings.
Thus, as with the P47 receiving white recognition bands around the engine cowling and vertical tail, the Typhoon becomes the first British aircraft to receive comparable recognition stripes.

In both cases, a sufficiently scathing comment on the prevailing standards of aircraft recognition/aircraft identification.

Kind and Respectful Regards Rudeerude, Uyraell.

VonWeyer
12-07-2010, 12:34 AM
Love the Typhoon. Both rugged looking and beautiful at the same time...

Agreed...Beautiful works of art Clave.

Clave
12-07-2010, 03:56 PM
Thanks for the kind comments!

The Napier Sabre engine was huge - 24 cylinders/36 Litre/2,200hp which is why the Typhoon needed such a large radiator.

Uyraell
12-07-2010, 05:18 PM
Napier Sabre series was a development of the Napier Lion Series of engines, which had powered several notable aircraft.
Probably the best known then, (but least-known now) was the Napier Heston Racer. Any researcher will readily discern in the Heston Racer certain similarities to the Typhoon, especially in the fuselage forward of the empennage and in the close-fitting cowling of the massive engine.
Visually at least, the source of some of Sir Sydney Camm's inspiration for the design of the Hawker Typhoon is rather obvious.
Nor should a researcher ignore the fact that Hawker Aircraft had had a hand in the construction of the Heston, along with certain consultative work from Teddy Petter (fuselage/wingroot joint fillets) and Tom Fendelton of Glosters (engine mounts and cowling internal stressing), later themselves involved in construction of both Typhoon and Tempest.
Nor should it be forgotten that Lanoe Hawker had himself urged the Hawker board to contribute to the Heston as "a useful exercise in modern engineering and construction techniques".

All of which is, imho, contributory to the both troubled history and later unbridled success of the Typhoon and Tempest.

Warm, Kind, and Respectful Regards Clave my friend, Uyraell.

Ealdwita
12-09-2010, 04:44 PM
Love the Typhoon. Both rugged looking and beautiful at the same time...

Bit like me then really. :=)

Churchill
12-09-2010, 05:24 PM
Hah, listen to this guy! :D

Mk VII
12-21-2010, 05:06 PM
The sole surviving example of the type rests in the RAF Museum; this a/c was supplied to the Americans as an evaluation sample and was swapped back by the Smithsonian some years ago.

Uyraell
12-22-2010, 01:41 PM
The sole surviving example of the type rests in the RAF Museum; this a/c was supplied to the Americans as an evaluation sample and was swapped back by the Smithsonian some years ago.

I'd like to see a current picture of that Typhoon, MKVII.

The last picture I saw of it, the thing was sitting in near darkness, looking very forlorn, despite an apparently new coat of paint.:evil:

Kind and Respectful Regards MKVII, Uyraell.

Mk VII
12-28-2010, 12:00 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hawker_Typhoon2.jpg

Uyraell
12-28-2010, 12:58 PM
Thank you MkVII.

A Much better pic than the last I chanced to see. :)

Kind and Respectful Regards, Uyraell.

kiwimac
12-28-2010, 05:48 PM
I kind of like the Hawker Fury and Tempest.

Uyraell
12-28-2010, 10:58 PM
Aesthetically, I'm inclined to agree, Kiwimac.

Having seen the "Baghdad Fury" close-up in Masterton in the late 1990's I can say the aircraft is certainly impressive to hear and see.

The Tempest II / Fury II lineage is fairly obvious. So also is the size of the aircraft.
The P47 Thunderbolt is often commented-upon, in terms of sheer size. The Tempest II is a close match.

The Tempest as powered by the Napier Sabre Mk II a2/A2d/e, Mk IV, Mk IV E, or Mk VI/ VI E is certainly a "last of it's kind" inline-engined fighter.
The like was never to be seen again, and was only thereafter but dimly echoed in aircraft like the Turbo Cavalier of the mid-to-late 1960's.

There is much of appeal in the Tempest and Fury II, I agree.

Kind and Respectful Regards Kiwimac, Uyraell.

kiwimac
12-29-2010, 05:12 AM
Aesthetically, I'm inclined to agree, Kiwimac.

Having seen the "Baghdad Fury" close-up in Masterton in the late 1990's I can say the aircraft is certainly impressive to hear and see.

The Tempest II / Fury II lineage is fairly obvious. So also is the size of the aircraft.
The P47 Thunderbolt is often commented-upon, in terms of sheer size. The Tempest II is a close match.

The Tempest as powered by the Napier Sabre Mk II a2/A2d/e, Mk IV, Mk IV E, or Mk VI/ VI E is certainly a "last of it's kind" inline-engined fighter.
The like was never to be seen again, and was only thereafter but dimly echoed in aircraft like the Turbo Cavalier of the mid-to-late 1960's.

There is much of appeal in the Tempest and Fury II, I agree.

Kind and Respectful Regards Kiwimac, Uyraell.

Ah, Hood Aerodrome! I remember going to a Warbirds hoolie there in the late 80s, saw the Fury there then.

kiwimac
12-29-2010, 05:25 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/tempest4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/Tempest3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/Tempest2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/SeaFuryTakingOff.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/sea-fury-fb11.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/kiwimac/tempestflying_550.jpg

Uyraell
12-29-2010, 08:17 PM
Many, MANY Thanks for posting those pics Kiwimac!! :)

A tremendous pleasure to see those, and recall various associate memories.

Warm, Kind, and Respectful Regards Kiwimac, Uyraell.

Clave
01-22-2011, 09:26 AM
The sole surviving example of the type rests in the RAF Museum; this a/c was supplied to the Americans as an evaluation sample and was swapped back by the Smithsonian some years ago.

I have been to see it, and it does have real presence - despite the lack of light I managed to get a photo and tweak it up to make it visible...