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View Full Version : .30 Carbine Tommy Gun



RoverDave
03-19-2010, 10:45 AM
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/9416/tommylightrifle1.jpg

http://img203.imageshack.us/img203/5229/tommycarbineviews.jpg

http://www.machinegunbooks.com/regular/Thompson18.jpg

Quote from Wiki:

The Thompson Light Rifle was an attempt by Auto-Ordnance to manufacture a light rifle for the US Armed Forces. The overall weapon was based on their well proven .45 ACP submachine gun. Although the original .30 Carbine calibre platform was based on the M1921/27 variants, It worked well but due to the war effort was found expensive for mass production and defied the concept of a Light Rifle.The only major differences from the Light Rifle and SMG was the barrel shroud which housed a quick barrel change device similar to the MG42, pressed steel components to ease production/reduce weight and the inlined stock reduced barrel climb improving accuracy. The Thompson Light Rifle was more reliable and accurate than the M1 Carbine that was adopted and also came with the capability of select fire, which made it close to the likes of the StG-44

Source :http://www.forgottenweapons.com/thompsoncarbine.htm

Nickdfresh
03-19-2010, 06:54 PM
Or they could have just made the M-1 Carbine selective fire--which they did by Korea (the M-2)...

Deaf Smith
03-23-2010, 09:16 PM
My understanding is the M2 was a 1944 creation.

Also, I suspect the 'Tommy gun' version shown above, being all steel, got pretty hot quickly. And if it was an open bolt design blowback design, I doubt it could be as accurate as the M1 carbine.

I also notice the magazines are strait 'stick' mags, but the carbine was a tapered case. If they were 30 round I would expect a possibility of jamming.

Deaf

Cuts
04-16-2010, 06:58 AM
I also notice the magazines are strait 'stick' mags, but the carbine was a tapered case. If they were 30 round I would expect a possibility of jamming.

It is ? :o

Deaf, have you confused the Cartridge, Caliber .30, Carbine, Ball, M1 with another rd ?

Nickdfresh
04-16-2010, 07:09 PM
My understanding is the M2 was a 1944 creation.

Also, I suspect the 'Tommy gun' version shown above, being all steel, got pretty hot quickly. And if it was an open bolt design blowback design, I doubt it could be as accurate as the M1 carbine.
...

Without checking, I think it was. But the M2 never actually saw service in WWII and wasn't in the hands of the troops until well after the War...