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flamethrowerguy
12-09-2009, 05:10 PM
The (second) breakfast of champions

http://www.thelocal.de/articleImages/23789.jpg
photo: DPA

Roger Boyes, the Berlin correspondent for the British newspaper The Times, explores the more mystifying rituals of Teutonic breakfast culture.

Germany is governed by ritual, as strange and as rigid as those in Japan. However, instead of the oriental tea-ceremony, the Germans have the “Second Breakfast.” Usually this is an elegantly packed, lovingly unpacked Leberwurstbrot, which must be consumed between 9:30 and 10 am.

The other day I went to the bakers for a cup of coffee and found that I had to balance my cup and my Fleischsalat (only Germans could come up with something called “meat salad” to put on your toast) on the very edge of a table because the place was full of orange-glowing rubbish collectors, carpenters and gardeners. A bus driver popped by and so did the policemen who should have been keeping an eye on the local Jewish memorial.

“Aha,” said one customer, “you celebrate Bergfest too?” Mountains give me nightmares – I have long argued for making Bavaria flat – so I didn’t understand the reference. Apparently the Bergfest, and my apologies to readers who have always known this, is celebrated at 12 o’clock on Wednesday because it is the summit of the working week. From then on, it is all downhill towards the well-deserved weekend.

Fine, I thought, I have learned something new. But the next day, while walking the dog, I noticed that all my fellow workweek mountaineers were sitting in their trucks eating Leberwurst on bread at precisely 9:30 am. It was like that irritating television advertisement for that midmorning snack Knoppers: “Mornings at half past nine in Germany!” It’s almost as if the stomachs of the whole German population have been programmed to rumble since their first Pausenbrot at school. How many calories does a German labourer need? How many Puddingbretzel have to be consumed before he can successfully check your tyre pressure or fix your sink? How many hours does he spend actually working?

There are even regional takes on this second breakfast culture. In Plattdeutsch, or Low German, it’s called Fofftein. We can deduce from the word that the North German spends no more than fifteen minutes on his Brotzeit. The Berliner, according to my investigations, takes 45 minutes. Perhaps a certain Bundesbank director could do the appropriate calculation to see how much time is crumbling away every month. Germany seems convinced that it has made the giant leap into a service society – shopping until 9 pm on Fridays! But it is still held back by archaic routines such as this second breakfast. Or have you ever tried to ring a plumber at 10:15 a.m.?

The answer – obviously – is to introduce the Anglo-Saxon model. The priority of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s new government has to be to persuade the nation to eat the full English breakfast every morning. Scrambled or fried egg, baked beans, grilled tomato, two sausages, mushrooms, fried bread. Tea with milk. Cornflakes or porridge. The resulting boost in productivity should put Germany firmly on the path to growth.

Now, you don’t have to be a top dietician to work out the problem with the English breakfast. It was devised in the Industrial Revolution to give workers the 3,000 calories they needed to dig in the coal mines; by four o’clock, they had burned up the energy and were ready for teatime. But you don’t burn 3,000 calories by working in a call centre. So, there is the risk of getting fat. Not, though, if you use high quality ingredients and eat in moderation. In that case, the breakfast can do you nothing but good. Organic eggs, home-made bread, grilled bio-tomatoes, meaty tight-skinned sausages.

Britain is full of happy octogenarians who have eaten the bacon-and-egg breakfast all their lives, all fitter than I am. Germans should convert now to get the nation’s proverbial intestines chugging. Who knows – maybe soon you will be able to get your washing machine fixed in the Fatherland at 9:30 am.

http://www.thelocal.de/opinion/20091207-23789.html

navyson
12-09-2009, 06:36 PM
Fleischsalat actually sounds pretty good.3844

navyson
12-09-2009, 06:49 PM
English Breakfast sounds good too:3845

Gary D.
12-09-2009, 08:24 PM
http://www.thelocal.de/opinion/
The answer – obviously – is to introduce the Anglo-Saxon model. The priority of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s new government has to be to persuade the nation to eat the full English breakfast every morning. Scrambled or fried egg, baked beans, grilled tomato, two sausages, mushrooms, fried bread. Tea with milk. Cornflakes or porridge. The resulting boost in productivity should put Germany firmly on the path to growth.

Now, you don’t have to be a top dietician to work out the problem with the English breakfast. It was devised in the Industrial Revolution to give workers the 3,000 calories they needed to dig in the coal mines; by four o’clock, they had burned up the energy and were ready for teatime. But you don’t burn 3,000 calories by working in a call centre. So, there is the risk of getting fat. Not, though, if you use high quality ingredients and eat in moderation. In that case, the breakfast can do you nothing but good. Organic eggs, home-made bread, grilled bio-tomatoes, meaty tight-skinned sausages.

20091207-23789.html

I pasted this into the Notes I keep for my research for my World War II-related writing. I doubt that with rationing, either side were consuming full breakfasts, either traditional German or British.

When I was in a British talk group, I made a comment about [what I considered horrible British breakfasts]: grilled kidneys (yuck!) and the like. Nope, they don't do that any more, unless one is talking of very-rich, landed gentry. They also thought I was strange when I remarked that I enjoyed Cornish pasties for Thanksgiving, instead of the usual turkey (which I consume in one form or another every day anyway--turkey bacon, for instance). Cornish pasties started out as tin-miners' diets packed in their lunch pails. I enjoy them, 'common' or not, but per my mother's recipe, and not the turnips and parsnips the Brits tuck inside.

As for breakfast, I like a fairly hearty one, and then mild lunch and just a snack for supper. Since I developed type-2 diabetes a few years ago, pancakes, which I love, tend to make my blood glucose zoom. Beans for breakfast sound pretty awful, though.

Thanks for the illumnating post.

rudeerude
12-09-2009, 09:05 PM
How about a Mexican style breakfast.Chorizo(Mexican sausage without the casing),scrambled egg and potato's with flour tortillas.No fork needed,just a piece of tortilla and scoop.I eat this on a Saturday or Sunday morning.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_YRhBvRTCMKc/SgObg0IfIOI/AAAAAAAAC48/LL0GqOKQGJk/s400/chorizo+eggs.jpg

tankgeezer
12-10-2009, 12:39 AM
The typical down south breakfast, Eggs with sausage, or bacon(all you Canadians restrain yourselves please,,) biscuits and sausage gravy. I have enjoyed many a Scot breakfast, and this runs neck,and neck.

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 05:09 AM
Beans for breakfast sound pretty awful, though.

The beans in tomato sauce for breakfast are probably the worst a continental European could imagine and for many this is the epitome of the English breakfast. I tried it myself on many occasions when being on holiday in Spain, means in places equally frequented by both British and German tourists. And I really liked it, it's just that my intestines and especially the rectum were pretty busy for the rest of the day.:D

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:12 AM
I thought rudeerude was a sick puppy, or eating puppy sick :D , until TG did us all a favour by not displaying his version of eggs with a liberal helping of dog vomit :D.

When I finally regained consciousness after clicking on TG's revolting linked image, the doctor in the ER said I should be out of therapy within a couple of years, assuming I can stop dry retching by then. :D

navyson
12-10-2009, 05:19 AM
How about a Mexican style breakfast.Chorizo(Mexican sausage without the casing),scrambled egg and potato's with flour tortillas.No fork needed,just a piece of tortilla and scoop.I eat this on a Saturday or Sunday morning.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_YRhBvRTCMKc/SgObg0IfIOI/AAAAAAAAC48/LL0GqOKQGJk/s400/chorizo+eggs.jpg
I'm with rudeerude on this one too, being from Texas around a large Hispanic population, this is one of my favorite breakfasts.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:21 AM
... it's just that my intestines and especially the rectum were pretty busy for the rest of the day.:D

Hence the unauthorised slogan "Heinz meanz fartz".

In case that is meaningless in Germany, it's a corruption of the advertising slogan for the baked bean maker Heinz: "Beanz meanz Heinz". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VXZJci-bCA

And this on beans' effects on the rectum. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6dm9rN6oTs

navyson
12-10-2009, 05:22 AM
@ RS,
Biscuits and sausage gravy are great for breakfast on a cold morning, but FOUR eggs???

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:36 AM
@ RS,
Biscuits and sausage gravy are great for breakfast on a cold morning, but FOUR eggs???

What do you mean by biscuits? What we call scones, i.e. a doughy lump cooked in an oven and usually served here with butter on it or as a sweet with something like honey or jam and cream? Biscuit here means what you call cookies.

http://rhubenesque.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/scone_narrowweb__300x4580.jpg


What is sausage gravy? Not that horrible slimy mass of white stuff to the left of TG's four egg monstrosity?

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:51 AM
Two of my favourite breakfasts, neither of which I nor anyone else can make successfully nowadays.

1. My grandmother used to make a light sweet lemon curry with minced beef for dinner and serve the leftover curry on buttered toast for breakfast the next morning. Brilliant winter breakfast. Not all that different in its own way to the TexMex breakfast.

2. Lamb's fry (liver) under rich brown gravy with bacon, a baked loin of lamb chop, and bubble and squeak. Used to start the day with this, and more, when I was a kid working in the shearing sheds. Yummm!

Also hard to beat honey on hot buttered crumpets and Vegemite on hot buttered toast.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:59 AM
Back to FTG's original post about German breakfast habits, my understanding is that up to and perhaps after WWI it was common in middle and upper class German households to have a breakfast which was a full and varied meal and could even include beer (although that might be an extension of a long European custom of drinking brewed drinks in preference to potentially disease-ridden water).

The big German breakfast was rather like the same thing with different food in England, and perhaps elsewhere in Europe.

I think there was a cinematic representation of the rich German breakfast in a film or TV series entitled Heimat maybe 20 years ago where the family breakfast had a much greater variety of food than anyone would attempt nowadays in the West for the main meal of the day, not least because they had cooks and maids.

navyson
12-10-2009, 06:28 AM
What do you mean by biscuits? What we call scones, i.e. a doughy lump cooked in an oven and usually served here with butter on it or as a sweet with something like honey or jam and cream? Biscuit here means what you call cookies.

http://rhubenesque.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/scone_narrowweb__300x4580.jpg


What is sausage gravy? Not that horrible slimy mass of white stuff to the left of TG's four egg monstrosity?
Well, those that are in this picture look like "our" biscuits. So, I guess they would be called scones. Except the only scones I've had here are like sweet shortbread with fruit baked into them. And yes, that horrible slimy mass of white stuff is sausage gravy.:mrgreen: It's just covering the biscuits. If I remember right, it's made with flour, water, salt, pepper, and bacon or sausage drippings, then add crumbled cooked sausage.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 07:07 AM
Except the only scones I've had here are like sweet shortbread with fruit baked into them.

We have fruit scones,

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3344/3281069469_7f183fb1b8.jpg




but I can't think of anything like a shortbread (a small dense buttery biscuit - or cookie for you :D ) which has fruit through it.


http://www.vascottishgames.org/2009%20Sponsor%20Logos/walkers_banner.jpg




And yes, that horrible slimy mass of white stuff is sausage gravy.:mrgreen: It's just covering the biscuits. If I remember right, it's made with flour, water, salt, pepper, and bacon or sausage drippings, then add crumbled cooked sausage.


Thanks for extending my time in 'sausage gravy recovery therapy' by about five years. ;) :(

navyson
12-10-2009, 07:10 AM
Two of my favourite breakfasts, neither of which I nor anyone else can make successfully nowadays.

1. My grandmother used to make a light sweet lemon curry with minced beef for dinner and serve the leftover curry on buttered toast for breakfast the next morning. Brilliant winter breakfast. Not all that different in its own way to the TexMex breakfast.

2. Lamb's fry (liver) under rich brown gravy with bacon, a baked loin of lamb chop, and bubble and squeak. Used to start the day with this, and more, when I was a kid working in the shearing sheds. Yummm!

Also hard to beat honey on hot buttered crumpets and Vegemite on hot buttered toast.
I don't think I've ever had anything curry related for breakfast. We have chipped beef on toast:3848

Liver and bubble and squeak for breakfast huh? Never would have thought of that. Although I like both.

And the same said biscuits hot with butter and honey or fruit jam is hard to beat too. Never tried Vegemite, is it actually THAT good?

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 07:33 AM
I don't think I've ever had anything curry related for breakfast.

A lamb samosa is alright (I had one for breakfast a couple of days ago) but it's a lot heavier, mainly because of the pastry, and 'currier' than the light curry my grandma did.


We have chipped beef on toast:3848

Not sure what that is, but it might be a bit like what we called 'savoury mince'. Minced beef cooked in stock with herbs, spices, Worcestershire and or tomato sauce (like tomato ketchup, but more flavour), sherry, and anything else you feel like throwing in. It's reduced until the liquid is sort of creamy, about the consistency of a taco filling.


Liver and bubble and squeak for breakfast huh? Never would have thought of that. Although I like both.

The trick is in preparing the liver so it doesn't taste off or gamey. I could do it once but I forgot how and every few years I decide I'm going to have it for breakfast and stuff it up and am disappointed.


Never tried Vegemite, is it actually THAT good?

For a Yank, probably not.

It's very salty and very sharp.

I heard one of your countrymen some years ago saying how he'd been told by Aussies how good Vegemite was, but he'd looked at it and it looked like axle grease and even though he could get it to his mouth and knew it wouldn't hurt him he couldn't bring himself to believe it wouldn't hurt him so he never actually tasted it.

Maybe you have something similar in America, as the Poms do with Marmite which pre-dated Vegemite but is pretty similar.
http://www.vegemite.com.au/vegemite/page?PagecRef=649&locale=auen1&siteid=vegemite-prd
http://www.spurgeon.org/~phil/marmite.htm

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 07:34 AM
Two of my favourite breakfasts, neither of which I nor anyone else can make successfully nowadays.

1. My grandmother used to make a light sweet lemon curry with minced beef for dinner and serve the leftover curry on buttered toast for breakfast the next morning. Brilliant winter breakfast. Not all that different in its own way to the TexMex breakfast.

2. Lamb's fry (liver) under rich brown gravy with bacon, a baked loin of lamb chop, and bubble and squeak. Used to start the day with this, and more, when I was a kid working in the shearing sheds. Yummm!

Also hard to beat honey on hot buttered crumpets and Vegemite on hot buttered toast.

I guess you can't deny your British roots, can you?;):D

tankgeezer
12-10-2009, 07:49 AM
Well, those that are in this picture look like "our" biscuits. So, I guess they would be called scones. Except the only scones I've had here are like sweet shortbread with fruit baked into them. And yes, that horrible slimy mass of white stuff is sausage gravy.:mrgreen: It's just covering the biscuits. If I remember right, it's made with flour, water, salt, pepper, and bacon or sausage drippings, then add crumbled cooked sausage.
And it is oh so good. (no more than once a fortnight though,, ) I just ripped the image, usually eat only 2 eggs, and one biscuit/scone with just enough gravy.Two crispy slices of American style bacon top it off perfectly.(retirement doesnt require many calories, and physical prowess is needed when evading the toothless mountain women,,)

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 08:00 AM
I guess you can't deny your British roots, can you?;):D

My roots are more Irish than British (or more accurately English), but there's a limit to what one can do with cabbage and potatoes. Which was pretty much the British attitude to treating my Irish ancestors with murderous contempt as a bunch of cabbages and potatoes during the Famine. But that is all forgotten now, as the Poms have done so much more since to piss off the Irish. ;) :D

Anyway, a great dish can be made by taking some mashed potato and adding shredded cabbage, bacon (or cooked corned beef), pepper, mace, and frying the lot in bacon fat and or butter and you have a very nice Colcannon.

It's better if you saute small cubes of parboiled but cooled and dry potato rather than using mashed potato, and then add the other ingredients. It gives you a meal of identifiably different tastes and textures rather than a somewhat mushy oversized rissole, and with nice crispy bits of spud in it.

But if you are going to use mashed potato just mash the boiled spuds because if you try to fry mashed spuds after milk has been added you'll never get them to brown properly as there is too much moisture in them.

navyson
12-10-2009, 08:05 AM
We have fruit scones,
Yes, those are the ones, except they are made sweet rather than plain.







but I can't think of anything like a shortbread (a small dense buttery biscuit - or cookie for you :D ) which has fruit through it.
The only ones I can find are McVities shortbread digestives with black currants. Couldn't find a reasonable sized pic to post.










Thanks for extending my time in 'sausage gravy recovery therapy' by about five years. ;) :(
Ahahahaha!:cool:


P.S. If I can find some Vegemite, I'll let you know my thoughts on it. I have seen Marmite for sale here, I'll have a look see today on the way home from work.

navyson
12-10-2009, 08:10 AM
FTG needs to let us know of what a German "first breakfast" consists, since we're on the subject. Please?

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 08:16 AM
P.S. If I can find some Vegemite, I'll let you know my thoughts on it. I have seen Marmite for sale here, I'll have a look see today on the way home from work.

There ain't that much difference.

They're both the sharp and salty concentrated residue of arcane industrial processes which previously were thrown out to poison the environment for future generations until someone persuaded humans they could eat it and, better still because of the added vitamin B, it was actually good for them.

If you don't like Marmite you sure ain't gonna like Vegemite.

If you like Marmite you might prefer it to Vegemite, or vice versa.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 08:20 AM
Navyson

Don't put Marmite / Vegemite on in a thick layer like jam.

A thin smear is all you need on some buttered toast, at least until you acquire a taste for it.

A teaspoon (or tablespoon depending upon taste) of Marmite / Vegemite added to a gravy when cooking it really lifts it for red meats and a bit less for chicken, but it's too strong for fish.

navyson
12-10-2009, 08:25 AM
Navyson

Don't put Marmite / Vegemite on in a thick layer like jam.

A thin smear is all you need on some buttered toast, at least until you acquire a taste for it.

A teaspoon (or tablespoon depending upon taste) of Marmite / Vegemite added to a gravy when cooking it really lifts it for red meats and a bit less for chicken, but it's too strong for fish.
Cool, thanks!

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 08:49 AM
Two crispy slices of American style bacon top it off perfectly.

What is American style bacon?

Are your pigs (or hogs / hawgs) anatomically different to those in the rest of the world?

They'd better be, and they'd better be huge, because as far as I'm concerned a measly two slices of the bacon we're used to isn't even worth getting out of bed for.

I wouldn't even think about shifting myself for anything less than half a dozen middle rashers, rind off, because they shrink down to about a third of the original amount of bacon which is about two rashers which I wouldn't get out of bed for ......

On reflection, I need about a dozen middle rashers just to make me think about getting up.


(retirement doesnt require many calories, and physical prowess is needed when evading the toothless mountain women,,)

1. None of them are toothless, although one lacks teeth in a convenient arrangement.

2. You may have confused 'mountain women' with 'mountin' women'.

3. I'd retire rather than face that ravening crew.

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 09:00 AM
FTG needs to let us know of what a German "first breakfast" consists, since we're on the subject. Please?

This excellent Wiki article pretty much covers it all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast
Take a look at this Myanmar breakfast dish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IMG_1601.JPG). I'd post the photo here but I don't want RS* to suffer another relapse.:lol:

tankgeezer
12-10-2009, 09:21 AM
Well, our bacon differs mostly in the way it is sliced,in thin, narrow strips. The Canadian/U.K. version is more of the slab type, and much thicker. I eat only a bit of it since I need to stay ahead of the herds of feral mountain women. :shock:

Gary D.
12-10-2009, 10:22 AM
How about a Mexican style breakfast.Chorizo(Mexican sausage without the casing),scrambled egg and potato's with flour tortillas.No fork needed,just a piece of tortilla and scoop.I eat this on a Saturday or Sunday morning.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_YRhBvRTCMKc/SgObg0IfIOI/AAAAAAAAC48/LL0GqOKQGJk/s400/chorizo+eggs.jpg

My mother used to scramble chorizo up with eggs, and they were good. I continued this practice until one time I happened to read the contents (I think by then the federal government was requiring labeling). I can't remember exactly what it was, but I know I asked my neighbors if they wanted the stuff--they did. I believe it said something like pig snouts and lymphatic glands. And to think I'd been eating this stuff all these years.

I am, by the way, an afficionado of Mexican food. When I was corresponding with a young ex-Soviet officer from St. Petersburg, I mentioned that they probably didn't have 'Mexican food' in that former imperial capital. Genadi said they did, in fact. I'd be curious to know what the Russian version of Mexican food tastes like.

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 02:46 PM
And this on beans' effects on the rectum. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6dm9rN6oTs

Here's the French answer incl. the unforgotten Louis de Funes and the effect of his cabbage soup. Watch it till the end, it is worthwhile:mrgreen::
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUlq9tISfxA

tankgeezer
12-10-2009, 04:22 PM
Chipped beef on toast is pretty much the same as sausage gravy,only has beef as the meat ingredient. also called creamed beef, or by the venerable appellation of SOS.

navyson
12-10-2009, 10:13 PM
There ain't that much difference.

They're both the sharp and salty concentrated residue of arcane industrial processes which previously were thrown out to poison the environment for future generations until someone persuaded humans they could eat it and, better still because of the added vitamin B, it was actually good for them.

If you don't like Marmite you sure ain't gonna like Vegemite.

If you like Marmite you might prefer it to Vegemite, or vice versa.
Oh my Lord, Vegemite is harsh! Good thing I bought the smallest bottle I found. The fourth bite of buttered toast with it on was passable (yes, surprisingly I got to four bites;)).

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 10:21 PM
Oh my Lord, Vegemite is harsh! Good thing I bought the smallest bottle I found. The fourth bite of buttered toast with it on was passable (yes, surprisingly I got to four bites;)).

It goes well with cheese in a sandwich.

Or have tiger toast, which is strips of Vegemite alternated with strips of cheese and toasted under a griller until the cheese melts.

herman2
12-17-2009, 12:06 PM
I usually eat a smoked herring for breakfast.It puts hair on your chest!

navyson
12-17-2009, 02:28 PM
I usually eat a smoked herring for breakfast.It puts hair on your chest!
What if you tried smoked herring with Vegemite? Might never get a date again!:mrgreen:

Nickdfresh
12-17-2009, 09:44 PM
Has anyone actually consumed the delicacy known as blood sausage? I for some still yet unknown reason actually Googled this subject and came up with the largely 20th century construction of the "proper breakfast" as eaten in the UK and Ireland, which includes healthy (or unhealthy :) ) doses of the standard fare or eggs, sausage, bacon, potatoes, etc. But also blood sausage is common and part of the traditional means of stretching any source of protein for people of lessor means, though now it's apparently considered a delicacy eaten by many. It's certainly not widely eaten in the US though I'm sure parts of Canada indulge in it and I'm sure it's available at some of the ethnic stores here.

But, is it worth actually finding?

flamethrowerguy
12-17-2009, 09:54 PM
Has anyone actually consumed the delicacy known as blood sausage? I for some still yet unknown reason actually Googled this subject and came up with the largely 20th century construction of the "proper breakfast" as eaten in the UK and Ireland, which includes healthy (or unhealthy :) ) doses of the standard fare or eggs, sausage, bacon, potatoes, etc. But also blood sausage is common and part of the traditional means of stretching any source of protein for people of lessor means, though now it's apparently considered a delicacy eaten by many. It's certainly not widely eaten in the US though I'm sure parts of Canada indulge in it and I'm sure it's available at some of the ethnic stores here.

But, is it worth actually finding?

It's considered a delicacy regionally in Germany as well. It kind of polarizes, you gotta love it or hate it. I couldn't eat it any day but occasionally I enjoy it- either on a sandwich with mustard or fried with onions.
P.S. I like the British term "Black Pudding" or "Blood Pudding" better.
See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blutwurst

Rising Sun*
12-18-2009, 12:10 AM
Has anyone actually consumed the delicacy known as blood sausage? I for some still yet unknown reason actually Googled this subject and came up with the largely 20th century construction of the "proper breakfast" as eaten in the UK and Ireland, which includes healthy (or unhealthy :) ) doses of the standard fare or eggs, sausage, bacon, potatoes, etc. But also blood sausage is common and part of the traditional means of stretching any source of protein for people of lessor means, though now it's apparently considered a delicacy eaten by many. It's certainly not widely eaten in the US though I'm sure parts of Canada indulge in it and I'm sure it's available at some of the ethnic stores here.

But, is it worth actually finding?

It'd be over 35 years since I last had it, sliced and fried in a pan.

I don't remember it being much different to various other rich sausages of the salami etc type. It obviously didn't grab me that much or I would have included it in my diet.

Like FTG said, here it was called black pudding then.

tankgeezer
12-18-2009, 08:17 AM
Its the one popular food I have not had while in Europe, or the U.K. Just didnt like the look of it...

pdf27
12-18-2009, 09:02 AM
Oddly, I'm a bit ambivalent about black pudding - it just tastes rather bland to me...

boyne_water
12-18-2009, 11:35 AM
Like most types of sausage the quality of black pudding varies.It should always be bought from a butchers,NEVER EVER from a supermarket.If anyone is ever in the fine town of Ayr I recomend Wilson,s the butcher in the MAIN ST.
Now im going to go and fry some.

tankgeezer
12-19-2009, 11:38 AM
My Scot lady friends seem to like it well enough, I guess next time I'm there I'll have to try it.. (kinda reminds me of a large cooked scab though,,)

Uyraell
01-31-2010, 04:10 AM
#37. Nick, Black Pudding here is still eaten as an occasional delicacy.

It is good eating, if fried properly, and not overcooked.

As to breakfast fare ... I don't indulge.

A pint mug of hot coffee, and a cigarette usually suffices.
I usually only eat once a day in any case, as I have little to no interest in A: food, B: cooking.

Of course, my alterego in another realm may have an influence in these matters, being that that character is a Winged Vampyr.

Regards, Uyraell.

flamethrowerguy
01-31-2010, 04:27 AM
You got to be one skinny fella!;)

Nickdfresh
01-31-2010, 09:05 AM
#37. Nick, Black Pudding here is still eaten as an occasional delicacy.

It is good eating, if fried properly, and not overcooked.

As to breakfast fare ... I don't indulge.

A pint mug of hot coffee, and a cigarette usually suffices.
I usually only eat once a day in any case, as I have little to no interest in A: food, B: cooking.

Of course, my alterego in another realm may have an influence in these matters, being that that character is a Winged Vampyr.

Regards, Uyraell.

I still haven't gotten around to trying it! I'm sure it's available here, though not at most supermarkets I'm sure as it's not generally popular here. There are of course ethnic areas in every city (Buffalo has a lot of Polish, German, Irish, and some British influences. There's also much more Canadian culture-bent here than the typical US city). I might hit a market in the city one of these days, maybe for Easter when the local shops really open up...

As far as breakfast, I prefer lighter fare for the most part: coffee and oatmeal usually to carb-up for a workout...I only eat heavy on the weekends usually, to kill a hangover or just if I'm starving...

tankgeezer
01-31-2010, 09:51 PM
This would be the preferred Milwaukee Breakfast, though it may also prove to be popular elsewhere.

Uyraell
02-01-2010, 01:40 PM
You got to be one skinny fella!;)

I am. I went from a pudgy young teen, to a rail-thin 40-odd year old. :mrgreen:

Regards, FTG my friend, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-01-2010, 01:43 PM
I still haven't gotten around to trying it! I'm sure it's available here, though not at most supermarkets I'm sure as it's not generally popular here. There are of course ethnic areas in every city (Buffalo has a lot of Polish, German, Irish, and some British influences. There's also much more Canadian culture-bent here than the typical US city). I might hit a market in the city one of these days, maybe for Easter when the local shops really open up...

As far as breakfast, I prefer lighter fare for the most part: coffee and oatmeal usually to carb-up for a workout...I only eat heavy on the weekends usually, to kill a hangover or just if I'm starving...

At least you don't do as I encourage My girlfriends to do.
When they talk of having a meal, be it breakfast or any other , I usually advise them to "knock him unconscious before they cook him". :mrgreen:

Regards my friend, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-01-2010, 02:27 PM
What if you tried smoked herring with Vegemite? Might never get a date again!:mrgreen:

Herman2 gets dates ?????????? :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
By what misalignment of the universe did that happen?? :confused: