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Rising Sun*
11-21-2009, 08:26 AM
A thread for WWII art and posters.

We're all familiar with Rosie the Riveter etc, but there is a huge library in many nations of less well known posters, some with their own special stories.

Such as this one, which followed the sinking of a clearly marked hospital ship by a Japanese submarine in 1943 off the coast of Queensland http://www.dva.gov.au/aboutDVA/publications/commemorative/centaur/Pages/index.aspx .


http://img695.imageshack.us/img695/5581/centaur.jpg

rudeerude
11-22-2009, 06:59 PM
Here is a few from American propaganda
3782

3783

3784

rudeerude
11-22-2009, 07:09 PM
A few specifically for American service men.
3785

3786

rudeerude
11-22-2009, 07:26 PM
An actual photo with propaganda in use,translation ?
3787

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 04:29 AM
Australian home front poster.

http://img502.imageshack.us/img502/565/tojosgoose.jpg

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 04:41 AM
More Australian posters http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-posters/post-1920.htm but click on items in menu at top of linked page for posters from other countries.

Notably Japan trying to drive a wedge between Australian and American forces (which the Japanese didn't need to do as in some instances the Australians and Americans did it all by themselves without any external help. ;) :D )

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 04:50 AM
I rather like this one, both for its emotional appeal and the simplicity behind it in selling the message.

http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/2581/dogwwii.jpg

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 04:57 AM
A few specifically for American service men.
3785

3786

Yeah, well, I'd probably take the chance. Especially if I was about to embark on what might be the last journey of my life.

And, on the first poster, I'd be bloody grateful to the powers that be for issuing a poster equivalent to aircraft recognition posters so that I knew what sort of women to look for. :)

flamethrowerguy
11-23-2009, 05:49 AM
http://www.dhm.de/lemo/objekte/pict/pl004404/index.jpg

"Black out! The enemy sees your light!"
An exceptional design IMHO.

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 07:05 AM
http://www.dhm.de/lemo/objekte/pict/pl004404/index.jpg

"Black out! The enemy sees your light!"


An exceptional design IMHO.

There is something I can't put my finger on about that image which reminds me of Fritz Lang's film Metropolis, but advanced and converted into the circumstances of WWII.

Yet there is, from my memory, nothing in Metropolis which is remotely like that.

So I suspect that the poster represents a form of German or other art of the era which I've seen before but can't now identify.

Any idea of the school of art?

VonWeyer
11-23-2009, 07:16 AM
These are well known...

flamethrowerguy
11-23-2009, 11:29 AM
There is something I can't put my finger on about that image which reminds me of Fritz Lang's film Metropolis, but advanced and converted into the circumstances of WWII.

Yet there is, from my memory, nothing in Metropolis which is remotely like that.

So I suspect that the poster represents a form of German or other art of the era which I've seen before but can't now identify.

Any idea of the school of art?

The poster was designed by graphic artist Otto Sander-Herweg (1880-?) in 1940. It was supposed to create a certain medieval "danse macabre" atmosphere and was meant to express the "existential menace to the German people".
Unfortunately there's no further info about the artist on the net...

The Historian
11-23-2009, 01:29 PM
These are well known...

Were we using the Uncle Sam poster in WWII?

Nickdfresh
11-23-2009, 08:16 PM
The icon was used since at least WWI and probably before. It's said the "Uncle Sam" character was invented by US troops in the War of 1812 after looking at the "U.S." moniker on boxes of ration meat...

Procyon
11-23-2009, 09:00 PM
Lots here http://www.ww2incolor.com/art/

rudeerude
11-23-2009, 09:33 PM
A British poster.
3803

rudeerude
11-23-2009, 09:38 PM
Japanese propaganda aimed at trying to turn the Aussies against America.
3804

The Historian
11-24-2009, 03:49 AM
The icon was used since at least WWI and probably before. It's said the "Uncle Sam" character was invented by US troops in the War of 1812 after looking at the "U.S." moniker on boxes of ration meat...

I knew it was real popular during WWI, inspired by a similar British poster featuring Lord Kitchener. Never heard the ration boxes story before!

rudeerude
11-25-2009, 10:07 PM
Canadian
3805

rudeerude
11-25-2009, 10:26 PM
I think the "Careless Talk "posters are interesting.
3806

3807

3808

3809

rudeerude
11-25-2009, 10:42 PM
And a few more...
3810

3811

3812

Rising Sun*
11-26-2009, 05:56 AM
Interesting how both the posters with the Nazi hand show the skin as almost reptilian. Another subtle propaganda influence.

Nickdfresh
11-26-2009, 08:26 AM
http://www.dhm.de/lemo/objekte/pict/pl004404/index.jpg

"Black out! The enemy sees your light!"
An exceptional design IMHO.

Since when did the RAF use He-111s? :) Or was this a dastardly Nazi plot to paint their own planes with British markings and bomb themselves in some elaborate false-flag operation...

flamethrowerguy
11-26-2009, 08:51 AM
Since when did the RAF use He-111s? :) Or was this a dastardly Nazi plot to paint their own planes with British markings and bomb themselves in some elaborate false-flag operation...

There was a brief discussion about the plane's identity before on the photo site (incl. the He-111 comparison). Someone assumed that this could rather be a Bristol Beaufort or a Blenheim...
http://www.ww2incolor.com/art/verdunkeln1.html

flamethrowerguy
11-27-2009, 05:26 AM
http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/2581/dogwwii.jpg

Did the British have something similar to show that a family member was in the field or KIA? The Germans didn't which is pretty remarkable since generally they had medals/badges/emblems for about everything.

Rising Sun*
11-27-2009, 05:50 AM
Did the British have something similar to show that a family member was in the field or KIA? The Germans didn't which is pretty remarkable since generally they had medals/badges/emblems for about everything.

Don't know about the British but I'm not aware of anything in WWII Australia, which at that time was fairly British in its attitudes and conduct, which publicly proclaimed the sacrifice of a serviceman or servicewoman.

As far as I'm aware the best Australian families got was a telegram from the Army or government "It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that XX10001 Private John Smith was killed in action on the dd mm yyyy.".

I wouldn't be surprised if that's as much as the British got.

The Americans have always tended to be rather more demonstrative publicly about a whole range of things to do with war and patriotism.

The British / Australian approach was pretty much that the service people were just performing their national duty, in an era when concepts of duty transcended anything most young people now begin to understand, and generally were to be well regarded for it but not individually honoured just for doing their duty.

The Historian
11-30-2009, 02:30 PM
Japanese propaganda aimed at trying to turn the Aussies against America.http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3804


Interesting how the Japanese used the Union Jack instead of the Australian flag on their poster...did they do that with all of them?

flamethrowerguy
12-03-2009, 05:40 AM
Nazi propaganda poster that was supposed to show who's really controlling the Anglo-Saxon press. Note how the name of the newspaper changes in the reflexion.

3823

Rising Sun*
12-03-2009, 06:03 AM
Nazi propaganda poster that was supposed to show who's really controlling the Anglo-Saxon press. Note how the name of the newspaper changes in the reflexion.

Notice also other subtle changes:

The SEMIT(E) woman (who looks like she could be Bette Midler's mother) changes to a Jewish appearance from the Anglo Saxon TIMES one; goes from blonde to black hair; light to dark eyes; smiling to jubilant or yelling mouth; uplifted to sagging breasts; and so on.

Quite clever in its own way, and bound to resonate with people already educated to respond negatively to images of Jews.

Chevan
12-03-2009, 06:37 AM
Notice also other subtle changes:
Quite clever in its own way, and bound to resonate with people already educated to respond negatively to images of Jews.
;)
Yeah, the very nice perfect propogand , that hints on jewish conspiracy which rules by the Ango-saxon world.
BTW that's my favorite
Neanderthalic art
http://www.bytwerk.com/gpa/images/diebow/scan4.jpg

The Historian
12-03-2009, 12:12 PM
Probably the most unique poster I've ever seen

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 04:45 PM
Something more exotic:

3853

Dutch poster from ~1942. "D'r uit! Indië moet bevrijd...", means "Out with them! Indië has to be liberated..."
"Indië" is a somewhat ancient Dutch term for a South/Southeast Asian region (incl. the Indian subcontinent and parts of Indonesia).

rudeerude
12-11-2009, 04:18 PM
I scanned a few pictures from my book "Life Goes to War A Picture History of World War II" by artist Tom Lea.

With the Marines on Peleliu,LIFE artist Tom Lea painted frightful scenes.This Marine had just landed."Something exploded" Lea wrote."He scrambled up from the ground as if embarrassed.He looked at his left arm and stumbled back to the beach.He never fired a shot"
3855

Battle fatigue hollows the eyes of a Marine at Bloody Nose Ridge.Lea recalled:"Last evening he came down out of the hills.He left the states 31 months ago.He was wounded in in his first campaign.He has had tropical diseases.He gouges Japs out of holes each day.Two thirds of his company have been killed,but he is still standing.So he will return to attack this morning.How much can a human being endure?"
3856

The Historian
12-14-2009, 10:17 PM
Wow. Those are some intense pictures. Any more from that book?

rudeerude
12-15-2009, 08:41 PM
Wow. Those are some intense pictures. Any more from that book?
There is but nothing compared to this.When I get around to scanning some more and photoshoping them to making them presentable I will post them.

Librarian
12-16-2009, 11:17 AM
Indeed, excellent examples! In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentleman, here are certain specimens of the genuine WW 2 graphic design in the flesh of the commercial art that once upon a time flourished as a major by-product of an audacious patriotic effort, assisted with pure consumerism, and personified in the prosperous scope of advertising business. :)

Graphic designers have been aptly dubbed "the practical idealists". Looking back on the forties as the beginnings of a Golden Age of consumerism, we will be able to see many changes in the human situation, and above all those new commercial attitudes towards those commodities which affected most directly the individual way of life – consumer goods. But in the same time we will be able to see that all the paraphernalia of human existence was above all a highly usable opportunity for the increased influence upon our deeply commercialized personal lives, involving the manipulative but absolutely feasible assumption that practically all customers are alike in that they are basically irrational animals who can be made to respond to a given, apposite profit-making stimuli.

So here they are:

Throughout the 1930s, as manufacturers advanced R&D, the most common of products were declared miraculous solutions to contemporary problems. In one of the more dubious wartime claims, the freshly developed clear tape purported to help in stopping poisonous gases from harming troops. Therefore - don’t worry GI Joe! Bring on that lousy 1,2,2-Trimethylpropyl methylphosphonofluoridate. Scotch tape is here!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-ScotchTape.jpg


Yet another step in the application of benevolent chemistry to better and completely liberated living! Those miserable totalitarian bastards are without asbestos! Well, there certainly is a possibility that those spine-chilling people actually have had a diabolic plan how to increase fabrication of pulmonary fibrosis, cancer of the lung, and mesotheliomas of the pleura and peritoneum with those curly fibers via enhanced exposure levels of domestic American population. However, our specialists are firmly maintaining the simple verity - that couldn’t actually happen!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-AsbestosLimited.jpg


You’ll be glad to know it is our precious vitamin reaching those brave boys who are teaching the Japs to remember Pearl Harbor! Yes, soldiers fortified with our domestic Victory Vitamin C from Florida orchards put the enemy on notice that American GIs could whip'em, be it in the air, on land, or at sea. That is – if they had plenty of that canned grapefruit juice…

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-CannedFloridaGrapefruitJuice.jpg


If they couldn’t don a uniform and fight those Axis bastards, folks on the home front could at least unbuckle their belts and imagine smacking Hitler or Tojo with – what else – a Hickok belt! Smacking someone with a cane, slipper or belt will become a criminal offence later, with possible jail sentences, but we have to keep our spirit in shape for the Japs and Krauts…

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Hickokbelt.jpg

Well, that’s all for today, honorable ladies and gentlemen.

In the meantime, as always – all the best! ;)

Nickdfresh
12-16-2009, 12:48 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-ScotchTape.jpg

LOL I can't imagine that aerial spraying would even be a very effective, reliable means to deliver chemical weapons to the battlefield...

The Historian
12-16-2009, 07:48 PM
Probably like crop dusting, it'd be effective if we were stupid enough to bunch up together in a small area

That cover looks like a mini-greenhouse, not to mention the layers of clothing & gear the soldier in question is wearing already

Munchausen
12-17-2009, 07:03 AM
I think the garbage bag would be more debilitating than the gas.

Librarian
12-17-2009, 03:03 PM
As usually, I’m late again, honorable ladies and gentlemen. However, certain novelties are already prepared for our distinguished thread, so here we go:


LOL I can't imagine that aerial spraying would even be a very effective, reliable means to deliver chemical weapons to the battlefield...

You might very well think that, my dear Mr. Nickdfresh, but of course, I couldn't possibly comment. At least not in this thread. :)

Nevertheless, I still do remember that my good old teacher, Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentis, PhD (United States Army) officially confirmed that those highly trained American specialists within the Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics at Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range had actually proved that aerial spraying indeed was the ultimate cost-effective solution for a truly effective application of chemical warfare materiel:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/SprayAttacks.jpg

Demonstration exercise of the forward observers assisted low-level aerial spraying, Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range – 1943

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Chemicalequipment.jpg

Pressurized aircraft sprayers for aerial dissemination of combat chemicals, Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range – 1943

Of course, absolute aerial supremacy represented the only necessitated precondition. :)

And now, back to our main theme:

Yes, once upon a time it really was announced that we will beat our swords into plowshares and our spears into pruning hooks. But, alas, we still do live in the acquisitive society of instant gratification, that can’t seem to distinguish forest from the trees. Therefore, we have to take what is at hand and to use our energy and those universal principles to create what we actually need. After all, we are keenly aware of our resources. We don’t want to fight but by jingo if we do... we’ve got the oil, we’ve got the men, and – wowse! - we got the big money too!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Shell.jpg

Yes Sir – that perilous smalltalk haberdashery will be quite unnecessary with our quality products. Our famous excellence gives you that important well-dressed feeling, so with your faultless Stetson styling you know that you look the best possible in the general public! You see what that smartly formal Squire Model in Sky Grey does for you? You will see that it can do much more for your country too!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Stetson.jpg

If our folks are to be tried in ashes, Jap's job will be to give some additional salvo of elation to them. No, those blood-thirsty Nip bastards don’t want just to end a war. Those rotten animals will come to bring a sword upon everyone! But, despite all the thunderous noise around, American Locomotive maintaines bright confidence in our righteous perspective, sustaines deeply embedded self-confidence to make those twisted spirits straight, to wipe away American fears and tears, because all the hope of future years actually is hanging breathless on ALCO’s fate!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-ALCO.jpg

Well, that’s all for today. In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentlemen, as always – all the best! :)

Chevan
12-17-2009, 11:37 PM
Wow dear mr Librarian, your managed library has a lot of damn exclusive and unique photos, never been scanned and posted in net before.I still can't find ever any one photo posted by you in another site.That's make me to conclude that you have to organize the personal photo-site in future. I'm not sure about copyrights, however.

Nevertheless, I still do remember that my good old teacher, Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentis, PhD (United States Army) officially confirmed that those highly trained American specialists within the Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics at Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range had actually proved that aerial spraying indeed was the ultimate cost-effective solution for a truly effective application of chemical warfare materiel:

Accidentally, were not those highly professional guys from school at orlando personaly responsible for chemical aerial spraying ( Agent Orange produced by Dow Chemical è Monsanto corporations) in Southern Vietnam a couple decades later?

JP Vieira
12-18-2009, 01:50 PM
Very interesting posters: thanks

Librarian
12-18-2009, 04:20 PM
Oh, thank you very much for your kind words, you my dear Mr. Chevan. You know, as an old-fashioned fellow I do know that even though educational methods have changed and broadened, students still are deeply dependent upon the library for instruction, information and successful study. If supplemented by the imagination and interest of the librarian, good old libraries will help development of a studying course rich in the possibilities of constructive, matter-oriented learning. :)

On the other hand, you could reflect upon my personal activities here as to some tiny mixture of an all-important, traditional educational service called "interlibrary loan". You see, once upon a time libraries used to lend freely each other rare source-materials needed by students and faculties for unrestricted scientific research and study. My only personal innovation is that the carrying charges are completely free for all the borrowers. You know, in that old fashioned, nowadays completely forgotten manner established by my personal benefactor, Mr. Andrew Carnegie. And our distinguished web-site is perfectly apposite for those munificent activities as well. :D


Accidentally, were not those highly professional guys from school at orlando personaly responsible for chemical aerial spraying ( Agent Orange produced by Dow Chemical è Monsanto corporations) in Southern Vietnam a couple decades later?

Only partially, my dear Mr. Chevan. Although they prepared and published an scientific study called "Marking and Defoliation of Tropical Vegetation" in December of 1944, in point of fact they had only rediscovered some previously known findings, already published in 1932 by renowned German authors Dr. Ulrich Müller – Kiel, Dr. Rudolf Hanslian, and Dr. Richard Roskoten. German specialists actually were first to mention that combat-distribution of bromomethyl ethyl ketone (also known as Homomartonite or Bn-stoff) saturated clay dust was capable to defoliate French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the First World War. Everything else represented only a logical and object-oriented evaluation and further technical refinement:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Do23-Spraying.jpg

Good old Luftwaffe Sprayer – Do 23 Schädlingskampfer in low-level battle against red spider mites, thrip and other pernicious pests - 1940

Of course, the residual effects of spraying bothersome plants was not publically discussed or reported. The main thing was that the chemicals got the job done… :rolleyes:

Full responsibility for all the extent and patterns of usage of Agent Orange and all other Rainbow Herbicides for tactical defoliation and crop destruction in Vietnam, however, lies upon those wise egg-headed guys connected with the project AGILE. You know… engineers don’t make the headlines – they just make the news. :army:

And now, back to our main theme:

Yes! 2 cents an hour are slave wages! AFL-CIO administration has to take more active role in mediations! Future changes in the organization of cooperative labor associations may be expected. Yes – management will be violently opposed against it. Secretary of Labor also, because he thinks that it would be a bad precedent for the nation. The press will be able to crucify the idea, and the public will be completely confused. Even some unions will be noncommittal! But one day in our common, distant European future of the XXI century, we will win a eight-hour day with a decent pay raised up to $ 1,90 an hour! And above eight would be time and a half! Exploited masses ought to be raised to a decent level of living!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-CutlerHammer.jpg

And here is one connected with your ancestors, my dear Mr. Chevan. As we all know, till Hell freezes over good old Vanyushka from Matushka will be provided with all necessary amounts of Saccharine. After all, he has to be in shape for the Krauts...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Swetenersadvertisment1944.gif

Well, that's all for today. In the meantime, as always – all the best! ;)

Nickdfresh
12-18-2009, 04:39 PM
As usually, I’m late again, honorable ladies and gentlemen. However, certain novelties are already prepared for our distinguished thread, so here we go:



You might very well think that, my dear Mr. Nickdfresh, but of course, I couldn't possibly comment. At least not in this thread. :)

Nevertheless, I still do remember that my good old teacher, Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentis, PhD (United States Army) officially confirmed that those highly trained American specialists within the Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics at Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range had actually proved that aerial spraying indeed was the ultimate cost-effective solution for a truly effective application of chemical warfare materiel:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/SprayAttacks.jpg

Demonstration exercise of the forward observers assisted low-level aerial spraying, Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range – 1943

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Chemicalequipment.jpg

Pressurized aircraft sprayers for aerial dissemination of combat chemicals, Orlando Toxic Gas & Decontamination Range – 1943

Of course, absolute aerial supremacy represented the only necessitated precondition. :)

...

Interesting. I admittedly do not know much about chemical warfare other than the fact it sounded very disturbing during my initial entry military training and something I hoped to avoid, even with the lurking threat of it during the first Gulf War. But what I have read is that they are often dodgy and unpredictable and effective use of anti-personnel agents in highly dependent on atmospheric conditions. You're quite right about air superiority, sir. I would add that smaller caliber antiaircraft units could also wreak havoc on low level "crop dusting" medium bombers and attack aircraft...

Regards...

windrider
12-18-2009, 05:50 PM
Hi Librarian,
are these from Life magazine ?

about aerial spraying : I remember that the americans spayed some insecticide in the jungles of the pacific to try to control malaria infested mosquitos. (DDT ?)
could it be the same unit posted above ?

Librarian
12-19-2009, 06:28 PM
Good evening, honorable ladies and gentlemen. I had a truly demanding daylight hours, but, fortunately, I had plenty of time to recover and to prepare my answers as well. :)


I would add that smaller caliber antiaircraft units could also wreak havoc on low level "crop dusting" medium bombers and attack aircraft...

Not obligatorily, my dear Sir. Actually, they would have been quite ineffective for adequate protection of employed ground troops. You see, numerous mathematical analyses undertaken by various scientific teams in Germany, USSR, Great Britain and USA as well, have concluded that the low-level attacks could be delivered to the enemy in a very cost-effective way, for the reason that the attacking aircraft can neither be accurately detected nor efficiently suppressed.

I think that this magnificent practical presentation undertaken not so long ago by Mr. Pete Teichman will be able to efficiently demonstrate all those advantages of the low-level attacking:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O6Eg_6DTso

A little bit more up to date variant of the low-level attacking advantages is presented here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fisq2v_w0wg&feature=related

You see, my dear Mr. Nickdfresh, only the fully in-depth developed variant of a so called umbrella-type of the AA barrage would have been adequate for the effective protection of those ill-fated ground troops. Unfortunately, the average ammunition expenditure for that activity is almost completely unattainable for all maneuvering units without fully mechanized light AA guns. Furthermore, if outfitted with some supplemental armor panels added to the bottom of the fuselage and protecting the fuel tanks and pilot, the engine cowling, and the landing gear mechanisms, attacking airplanes were able to achieve some additional advantages, like practical immunity to the small-arms fire.

Furthermore, with a carefully selected and sufficiently chemically stabilized toxic compounds, all those surprised ground troops would have been lifeless approximately 4-10 seconds after the speedy combat flypass. It was well-known, for example, that inhalation of the HCN in concentration of 300 mg/m3 is immediately fatal (Patty, 1942), and those concentrations were fully achievable in mid-fourties.

For example, imagine this technical configuration: four streamlined liquefied gas dispensers, each holding cca 85 – 100 l and weighing approximately 170-190 kg, are fastened to racks underneath the wings of the Republic P 47 Thunderbolt. When the discharge line is operated in a high speed low level flight (supported by long salvos of those 12,7 mm machine guns if necessary) by electrical means controlled by the pilot, the pisonous chemical runs out of the tank and is broken by the air blast into a finely atomized cloud of droplets, which fall to the ground forming a rectangular, clearly visible pattern.

The larger drops fall almost underneath the plane, while the small ones are carried farther down-wind. The length of the pattern is the distance that the airplane has traveled during the time the tank was emptied. The lower the airplane and slower the wind, the narrower the pattern (and vice versa). A wind at right angles to the line of flight gives a wider pattern than a parallel wind.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Lowlevelchemicalattack-2.jpg

Low-altitude fighter bomber gas dispersing – completely apposite combination for a cost-effective combat

Now imagine our dearly beloved high-power birdie hurling some 15 meters above the ground with 550-600 km/h, and peppering everything with 0.50 cal. fire. Approximately an area about half a mile long by about a quarter a mile long may be covered by one of the four tanks. If necessary, all four tanks could be use in the same time too for more intensive saturation. The entire area thus covered is contaminated by highly toxic vapor and droplets of chemical. Since the agent has been finely atomized, evaporation is very rapid, and the immediate concentration of gas in the air is extremely high, greater then obtained by any other weapon, with the lethal effects produced more quickly, and all the toxic possibilities of the agent more completely realized.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Lowlevelchemicalattack.jpg

Tally Ho! Good old Coughin’ Coffin Jug is speeding and pouring in a low-level chemical attack: enemy will be unable even to aim successfully

By my personal opinion, my dear Mr. Nickdfresh, those old American engineers, tacticians and technicians possessed an adequate amount of preparation and exercise to write down some intriguing headlines, like "Performance That Proves Progress".


Hi Librarian,are these from Life magazine ?

Howdy, my dear Mr. Windrider. No, not only from "Life", but also from "Colliers", "Esquire", "Look", "Good Housekeeping", and "The Saturday Evening Post". :D


about aerial spraying : I remember that the americans spayed some insecticide in the jungles of the pacific to try to control malaria infested mosquitos. (DDT ?)
could it be the same unit posted above ?

Sorry, my dear Mr. Windride I don’t know. All subsequent transfers and reallocations of military units engaged in those experiments at Orlando Rage and Chemical Yards were not mentioned in literature that was available to me. :(

And finally, another startling ad from the forties. I am sure that additional comments are completely unnecessary:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-ALCO2.jpg

In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentlemen, as always – all the best! :)

rudeerude
12-20-2009, 12:41 AM
Another scan from my book "Life Goes to War A Picture History of World War II"

LIFE artist Fletcher Martin's conception of the desperate fire fight on Tunisia's Hill 609,which occurred after an obscuring cloud had abruptly lifted and the Americans (right) saw the Germans(left) only 15 yards away.The sudden battle ended after some 40 Germans were killed
3866

Chevan
12-20-2009, 12:42 AM
You see, my dear Mr. Nickdfresh, only the fully in-depth developed variant of a so called umbrella-type of the AA barrage would have been adequate for the effective protection of those ill-fated ground troops. Unfortunately, the average ammunition expenditure for that activity is almost completely unattainable for all maneuvering units without fully mechanized light AA guns. Furthermore, if outfitted with some supplemental armor panels added to the bottom of the fuselage and protecting the fuel tanks and pilot, the engine cowling, and the landing gear mechanisms, attacking airplanes were able to achieve some additional advantages, like practical immunity to the small-arms fire.

That's is the very true.
The Low-level attacking is an effective way to neitralize the AA-defence. Yet in Eastern Front the the soviet "Night witches" did use the biplan U-2 as a bomber , droping the bombs from an extra-low altitude ( up to 10-15 metres). But they did it by night and with cut off engines:)
The Germans even tryed to organize the something kinda AA-umbrella-type defence, however it worked not much efective when the group of U-2 began the attack the target all together from different directions at one moment. In the war of pacific the we might to observe the same situation- the Japanese kamicadze , if it was possible, tryed to attack an american ship from different angles and direcions at the moment- to neitrlaize the ability of AA-command to concentrate the fire on the each one of them.
In Vietnam i know the F-4 fled from the attacking S-75 missles and ZSU-24 shells ,diving down to low altitude.

rudeerude
12-20-2009, 12:56 AM
A propaganda poster depicts the Philippine resistance movement during the first year of Japanese occupation. Following the fall of Corregidor on May 6, 1942.
3867

Chevan
12-20-2009, 01:14 AM
Oh, thank you very much for your kind words, you my dear Mr. Chevan. You know, as an old-fashioned fellow I do know that even though educational methods have changed and broadened, students still are deeply dependent upon the library for instruction, information and successful study. If supplemented by the imagination and interest of the librarian, good old libraries will help development of a studying course rich in the possibilities of constructive, matter-oriented learning. :)

On the other hand, you could reflect upon my personal activities here as to some tiny mixture of an all-important, traditional educational service called "interlibrary loan". You see, once upon a time libraries used to lend freely each other rare source-materials needed by students and faculties for unrestricted scientific research and study. My only personal innovation is that the carrying charges are completely free for all the borrowers. You know, in that old fashioned, nowadays completely forgotten manner established by my personal benefactor, Mr. Andrew Carnegie. And our distinguished web-site is perfectly apposite for those munificent activities as well. :D

The old-fashioned method is endeed fine , my friend, however not every man has the possibility to visit the really big and great library , like yours is.The tiny buatiful city Senta is probably the oldest city of Serbia and Hungary with great cultural traditions and architecture.I know in my city-library i can't find even single issue of mentioned above magazine "Life". Thanks to you for your highly useful postings.


And here is one connected with your ancestors, my dear Mr. Chevan. As we all know, till Hell freezes over good old Vanyushka from Matushka will be provided with all necessary amounts of Saccharine. After all, he has to be in shape for the Krauts...

yeah,thick-mug, just give him enough the lend-lise Saccharine and chocolate and he will sleep all the further battle:)

Librarian
12-21-2009, 06:26 PM
Well, if truth is to be said, free donations and carefully planned procurements actually are representing a miracle, my dear Mr. Chevan. You know, while my distinguished colleagues were not in agreement as to whether it is better to keep all books under one roof in special departments or to spread departmental libraries over the country, I have developed large collections of everything. As you know, all work and no fun isn’t good for anyone. :lol:

On behalf of those AA defense methods, I think that a specialized thread will be the best solution. After all, department of military sciences is highly desirable in every decent library. ;)

And, please – don’t be so harsh toward poor Vanyushka. You see, any fair appraisal of the graphic design of the War would clearly demonstrate that some kind of a lucrative optimism was the central figure in all those wartime ads. The euphoric, and basically humanistic spirit expressed itself in different symbols of romantic optimism in human destiny, amongst which numerous artists featured prominently materialistic moments of every kind, shaping the ideals of the consumer society.

And the Motoring Dream was sometimes epitomized to the point of pure surrealism – like in this absolutely marvelous ad created by Willys – Overland Co. in 1943:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-WillysOverland.jpg

You know, my dear Mr. Chevan, chances for the global post-war prosperity actually have been quite real! With Jeep money pouring in, Willys-Overland began planning a postwar car. As early as 1942 John Tjaarda, father of the magnificent 1936 Lincoln Zephyr, approached W-O Board chairman Ward Canaday and suggested that the Willys Jeep become the basis for what he envisioned as a postwar world car! Tjarda pointed out that since the Jeep and Jeep parts were already stockpiled all over the globe, why not sell civilian and military versions worldwide after the war? Canaday considered Tjaarda’s idea, but then put it on hold…

Just imagine all those perspectives of an all-steel unitized construction, engineered in a manner that engine could be placed either front or rear, as Tjaarda suggested! However, although his ideas got more consideration after the war, when all US car manufacturers experimented with small, inexpensive cars, on the strength of surveys that asked "Does your neighbor want a smaller car?" some Big Shots concluded that neighbors might have wanted smaller cars, but the banks wanted bigger ones. And so, poor Vanyushka yet again remained without a proper corporate lineup… Poor fellow. Everything started with such a great anticipation:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-WillysOverland2.jpg

But enough with these outward appearances. We have to find some place for some real art. So here is an classicistic example in traditional oil on canvas technique:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Victory-KrivonogovPA.jpg

П. А. Кривоногов (P. A. Krivonogov): Победа / Victory,1945

Well, thats all for today. In the meantime, as always – all the best! :)

Rising Sun*
12-21-2009, 07:13 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-WillysOverland2.jpg


I'm no expert on US uniforms and equipment, but does that Yank first to left of the Soviet in the foreground look more like USMC in the Pacific than US Army in Europe?

Librarian
12-22-2009, 03:51 PM
Honestly – I don’t know, my dear Mr. Rising Sun. Yes, to certain extant it surely looks like the USMC Herringbone Twill, but it has to be emphasized that the sheer volume of items made during the war regularly resulted in numerous variations in shades, not even to mention many variants of discoloration due to fading and soiling. When millions of items are produced, perfectly matching shades, even of the same color, are rare. With regard to Olive Drab 3, for example, it was mentioned in literature that originals have ranged from olive, to pea green, or mustard-brown to olive brown…

However, that possibility previously mentioned by you still is completely legitimate, my dear Mr. Rising Sun. :)

And now, here we have one highly expressive painting which never betrayed the classicistic heritage. This painting, however, was made on the other side of the hill:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/FranzEichorn-DeutscheSoldatenimSchu.jpg

Franz Eichorn: Deutsche Soldaten im Schützengraben / German Soldiers in Trenches – 1944

This painting is, in a sense, the result of a wonderfully successful compromise between the official requirements of social portraiture and the personal, highly emotional vision of the artist, who – no matter how calculated the balance nor how skilful the interweaving of his movements – never lost sight of the fact that this is a story, above all, about human beings in a completely inhuman conditions.

In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentlemen, as usually – all the best! ;)

Schuultz
12-26-2009, 09:09 PM
Love all those pictures, Librarian!

You don't happen to be able to find any more in the infinite depths of your library?

Hvala!

Librarian
12-28-2009, 10:58 AM
Mit tiefer Dankbarkeit, sehr geehrter Herr Schuultz! :D

Of course, we do have a quantity of additional books connected with the WW 2 paintings in our repository. Here is another one, finished in slightly different, but still highly artistic gouache technique. It evokes an exotic world – in its difference and brooding shadows – that can be confused with no other. As directly stated by the artist, his aim in painting had been the most exact transmission possible of his most intimate impressions of the given occurrence.

The result of such realism has led many to preface it with the adjective minuciosity.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/CaptureofGuamKoheiEzaku.jpg

The Capture of Guam by Kohei Ezaku (fragment) – 1942.

And please – don’t worry: many supplementary paintings are already on my scanning list.

In the meantime, as always – all the best! ;)

Uyraell
01-19-2010, 07:03 AM
There is something I can't put my finger on about that image which reminds me of Fritz Lang's film Metropolis, but advanced and converted into the circumstances of WWII.

Yet there is, from my memory, nothing in Metropolis which is remotely like that.

So I suspect that the poster represents a form of German or other art of the era which I've seen before but can't now identify.

Any idea of the school of art?

Probably what is today loosely called "Bauhaus" the origins of which begin in 1926/27 which was when Lang produced "Metropolis". Bauhaus as a term went on to become somehow identified as an architectural style, which is how it is known today, much as is the case with "Art Deco".

Those are my thoughts on reading your query, RS old mate,

Kindest Regards, Uyraell.

Librarian
01-20-2010, 07:31 PM
And finally, after a long time, honorable ladies and gentlemen, we are able to present some intriguing novelties connected with the main theme of this thread.

As you know, WW2 took soldiers to distant shores they would probably never have otherwise seen. Between June and September of 1941, approximately 600 Allied soldiers were able to escape the island of Crete, and one of those moments was captured by a prominent British painter who attended classes at the prestigious École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and exhibited his paintings at Salon des Tuileries and Salon d'Automne long before the outbrake of the WW2.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/AnthonyGross-Disembarking1941.jpg

Anthony Gross : Disembarking from the Garrett’s barge – 1941 (watercolor and ink wash on paper)

This sadly forgotten and highly talented British artist developed a novel and dramatically simple range of colors, a slashing brush technique, and a taste for independence and frankness in subject matter, always working in accordance with his own convictions, contriving a spontaneous enclosure of war framed by simple but incredibly convincing texture. That’s why his art is perhaps the first which can truly be called "of our time".

Another highly intriguing, but to certain extant completely different piece of art, is arriving from a land Down Under. Although Australian painters usually found ample inspiration in the landscape and daily life of their rugged land, their natural spirit of camaraderie stood them in good artistic stead. In 1942, for example, renowned Australian poet Jack O’ Hagan wrote:

When a boy from Alabama
Meets a Girl from Gundagai
There’s a silver lining in the sky.

And that’s the perfect motto for this charming wartime painting:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/OneSundayAfternooninTownsville.jpg

Roy Hodgkinson : One Sunday Afternoon in Townsville – 1942 ( pencil and crayon with watercolors)

His obvious need to lay accent on those socially ample emotions in a clear, objective way, and his insistence upon artistic craftsmanship, added a true sentiment of his own, which concentrated on more intimate and tender themes of war. His splendid critical directness (US troops’ better pay and more attractive uniforms were all too eye-catching to some Australian girls during the second World War), as well as those boldly simplified color arrangements gave a fresh, but enduring flavor to wartime paintings.

Well, that’s all for today, honorable ladies and gentlemen. In the meantime, as always – all the best! :)

Uyraell
01-21-2010, 04:42 AM
Your informational talents simply astound me, Sir Librarian ! :D
Many Many Thanks for these fine and enlightening images :).

Kindest Regards, Uyraell.

Librarian
01-21-2010, 08:02 PM
Oh, thank you very much, my dear Mr. Uyrael, but the reference books actually are representing the only secret of my success. You know, all books fall into two classes – those read for fun or for information and those consulted for a definite fact or piece of information. The latter are reference books, and finding a good set of reference books on the shelf may be like meeting an old friend. After all, haphazard use of reference books wastes more time during the average university career than anything else, unless we consider the Student Union… :)

Alas, I don’t have all those already planned scans connected with numerous important wartime artists to show you yet, but I'm assuring you that pretty soon you will be able to observe a very special pair of genuine wartime paintings. ;)

In the meantime, as always – all the best!

Uyraell
01-22-2010, 04:32 AM
One suggestion I would respectfully make, is an artist named Peter McIntyre.
He painted numerous scenes of NZ and other troops in action, depicting occasions such as the Fallschirmjaegers descending on Crete, the advance at El Alamein, and others.

Kindest regards, Uyraell.

windrider
01-27-2010, 01:18 PM
Here's a few more from allied propaganda.

I have a question regarding one of these...
How does recycled fat is related to explosive production ?
Maybe one of our ammunition specialist could explain ?

Lots more to come,
I'm currently reading the History of world propaganda 33-45.
I will scan only those that are not already available on the net...

regards

Uyraell
01-28-2010, 02:44 PM
Windrider, I'm no expert on explosives, but I can provide a partial answer for you.

Many forms of explosive require a "suspension medium": much as when one dissolves enough salt in water, the water ceases to be "water" and instead becomes a "saturated solution".

As the war progressed, various ingredients of explosive compounds come to require increasingly diverse suspension media.
The later forms of "plastique" explosives are an example of this, as is what today we call "Thermite".

However, the earlier forms of compound such as Tri-Nitro-Toluene and "Amatol" remained in wide-spread use, which meant that animal fats were useful as part of the suspension medium these compounds required.

I'm not good for much more detail on the topic than that, and add a caveate that the ordnance/explosives experts on the forum may well provide more and better detail on the topic, so, what I have written here may stand to be corrected.

Kind Regards windrider, Uyraell.

Librarian
01-28-2010, 09:06 PM
Well, I think that I will be able to provide an all-inclusive answer for you, my dear Mr. Windrider. You see, different vegetable oils and animal fats are representing an excellent source of glycerol, and that compound – if nitrated with nitric and sulfuric acid – is able to produce glycerol-trinitrate, which is an essential ingredient of smokeless gunpowder and various explosives such as dynamite, or propellants as cordite. :)

Production is very undemanding: the fats, heated with water in a pressurized tank, are decomposed into fatty acids and glycerol at the temperature of some175-200 С. This process is known as pressurized hydrolysis, but we have numerous other processes on our disposal, for example, interesterification, acydolysis (the most notable products are so called acetofats, incredibly usable for plastification of nitrocelulosis!) alcoholysis (an excellent method for fabrication of bio-Diesel fuel and glycerol, which in that case actually is representing a by-product!), polymerization, sulphatization, etc.

Of course, if you are interested for those highly intriguing processes, we will open a special thread - The Combat Chemistry. :D

And now – back to our main theme in this thread! Fortunately, we have certain novelties connected with the wartime art. Their specific value is embedded in fact that they are reflecting the very same historical event – Japanese attack on Clark field - but from a completely different perspective.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/SatoKei-AirRaidonClarkField.jpg

Sato Kei – Air Raid on Clark Field, 1942 (watercolors and ink)

Painted in guache-opaque water color, this painting is a typical product of strictly naturalistic, visually correct school of Japanese art. Everything is indeed meticulously drawn, but the over-all impression is that the objects in painting are away from the spectator, suggesting an effect of isolation, although every part of the work has its pictorial value. Somehow nothing seems able to disturb the preemphasized order. Whatever the importance of this picture may be as a historical document, I regard it as a pretty calm and muted visual symphony.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/FredeVidar-ClarkField.jpg

Frede Vidar - The aftermath of the Japanese attack on Clark Field, 1941 (pencil and watercolors)

This sadly forgotten American artist was noted for his elegant, restrained calligraphy, using the pencil to shadow and draw at the same time. Perspective was slightly sacrificed to the artist’s inherent concept of array preservation, and restrained colors he chose did not restrain his emotional intensivity. He bravely felt entirely free to endow with pale colors he chose the objects he observed, because his cursive visual stenography, with little curving strokes, was light, swift, graceful, and seemingly artless. His virtuosity enhances the objective moment in the things he drew and painted, and the rapidity of his sketching has enabled him to capture moods and occurrences inaccessible to slower-working painters.

Well, that’s all for today, honorable ladies and gentlemen. In the meantime, as always – all the best! ;)

windrider
01-29-2010, 07:59 AM
Well, thank you both for your answer regarding the use of fat in explosives !
(and an exceptionnaly detailed one as always from our dear friend Librarian).
I guess that without the chemistry, there would have been much less ww2 history to discuss about !

Back to topic :

The japanese seemed to like these bombing views from the sky.
The first one is a depiction of the jap airforce bombing New-York, nothing less !
The other two shows that the Brits artist were a bit more "terre-à-terre" in their approach of the subject !:D

windrider
01-29-2010, 08:18 AM
A few more from the axis.
Can't seem to include the pics in the post other than an attachment link ?
I've read the FAQ section regarding that, but maybe I'm thechnology-deficient this morning ? That's it I'm getting another coffee !

The last one is interesting, I guess they need all that paper to upgrade their Tank armors !:rolleyes:

Uyraell
01-30-2010, 12:40 AM
Windrider, you're very welcome. :)
As I said, I was confident other folk know more than I, regarding explosives.
Librarian, my Thanks for the detailed supporting data. :)

Kindest Regards Gentlemen, Uyraell.

JP Vieira
01-30-2010, 03:20 AM
Very interesting stuff: thanks for sharing

windrider
02-01-2010, 08:19 AM
here's a few more axis posters.
Notice the nice happy nazi fraulein !
Little SA parade cutouts for children,
Also, a stamp representing a 1939 VW beetle, They said that every german citizen would get one at the end of the war...:rolleyes:

windrider
02-01-2010, 08:37 AM
Here's a few more freom Germany and German-occupied countrys.
Even some good humor there on "It's a long way to Rome" poster.
The caption explains the maximum speed of a snail compared to the allieds !
Poor general Clarck !:D

The Historian
02-10-2010, 06:28 PM
Poor General Alexander too! :D


I like how the Germans were warning about Americans destroying European culture in that last poster--we kinda did that with jazz and rock and roll after the war

windrider
02-17-2010, 01:58 PM
Poor General Alexander too! :D


I like how the Germans were warning about Americans destroying European culture in that last poster--we kinda did that with jazz and rock and roll after the war

Not to mention chewing gum and coca-cola...:mrgreen:

This one is from USA, 1939 or 1940

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4002/4364607633_630a0a0c8d.jpg

rudeerude
02-17-2010, 03:40 PM
A little armored theme adds.First is a Fisher ad with M-26 "TIGER TAMER" tank, illustration by Dean Cornwell

3990

"Better than a rabbit's foot!" Fisher ad illustration by Dean Cornwell.

3991

Patton in a John Hancock Insurance ad "He fought his battle in seven league boots"

3992

rudeerude
02-17-2010, 03:52 PM
And some Winchester ads,I like the hunting one.

3993

3994

3995

The Historian
02-17-2010, 06:56 PM
Patton in a John Hancock Insurance ad "He fought his battle in seven league boots"

3992

And the pearl-handled revolvers with the notches for killing a few of Pancho Villa's lieutenants....:mrgreen:

Uyraell
02-19-2010, 02:06 AM
A little armored theme adds.First is a Fisher ad with M-26 "TIGER TAMER" tank, illustration by Dean Cornwell

3990

"Better than a rabbit's foot!" Fisher ad illustration by Dean Cornwell.

3991

Patton in a John Hancock Insurance ad "He fought his battle in seven league boots"

3992

Better than a rabbit's Foot ..... not by much.

It is good to see the advert though.

Many Thanks for the opportunity to see these.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

The Historian
02-19-2010, 08:51 AM
Better than a rabbit's Foot ..... not by much.

It is good to see the advert though.

Many Thanks for the opportunity to see these.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.


With a Sherman going up against Tigers and Panthers I'd need all the luck I could get!

Uyraell
02-19-2010, 05:21 PM
With a Sherman going up against Tigers and Panthers I'd need all the luck I could get!

My thought entirely, Historian! :)

I've never regarded the Sherman as a "good" tank, I regard it as merely barely adequate, and then only in the Pacific Theater. For Europe it was under-armoured, out-gunned, and by virtue of those faults, basically inadequate even in the Infantry Support role for which it was designed and intended. I Agree the Tank Destroyer doctrine of the US Army was equally at fault for the mis-employment of the Sherman, however.

Having said the above, I have to admit the old M4 Ronson (aka Sherman) is far from my favourite tank, and I'm inclined to think the M27 (derived from the T23 through T27 experimental series) would have been a better choice, for Europe at least. In that, I agree with Nickdfresh, as he has stated similar views on the M27 in another thread.

Kind Regards Historian, Uyraell.

The Historian
02-19-2010, 09:40 PM
I'd give the Sherman more credit in the Pacific theatre, where most Japanese tanks had thinner armor and smaller-caliber guns, but I think the use of the Sherman in Europe was based on assumptions that the Tiger and Panther wouldn't be fielded as main battle tanks--a view that turned out to be wrong. The decision to delay design in heavier tanks made in 42/43 was the US's biggest mistake in the war, although our air superiority seemed to compensate in 1944/45

Panzerknacker
02-21-2010, 12:51 PM
Italian warning poster:

to any traitor...to any saboteur.

http://img6.imageshack.us/img6/4381/escanear0015.jpg

Panzerknacker
02-21-2010, 12:57 PM
Other italian.

New weapons

Will laugh well the one whom laugh the last...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v384/yomolosolo/Carteles%20ww2/15NUEVASARMASreirmejorquienraelltimoitaliano.jpg

The Historian
02-21-2010, 08:23 PM
I figured the Italian propaganda machine would chug out something of the sort--first time I saw any real WWII Italian propaganda though

Rising Sun*
02-22-2010, 05:37 AM
Italian warning poster:

to any traitor...to any saboteur.

http://img6.imageshack.us/img6/4381/escanear0015.jpg

Shooting in the back while tied to a chair?

Was that the regulation or usual Italian method of execution by firing squad?

Rising Sun*
02-22-2010, 05:42 AM
Other italian.

New weapons

Will laugh well the one whom laugh the last...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v384/yomolosolo/Carteles%20ww2/15NUEVASARMASreirmejorquienraelltimoitaliano.jpg

The flag on the helmet for the intended Brit on the left is a lot closer to the Japanese rising sun. A curious error when the Italians would have been well aware of what the Union Jack looked like.

Although the rendition of Stalin is surprisingly true to life. :)

rudeerude
02-23-2010, 02:47 PM
Here are some auto manufacture ads for the war effort.Pontiac magazine ad showing Oerlikon automatic anti-aircraft cannon on a Navy ship.
4001

4002

4003

Panzerknacker
02-23-2010, 04:10 PM
Nice posters Rudee



Shooting in the back while tied to a chair?

Was that the regulation or usual Italian method of execution by firing squad?


I am not familiar with any ww2 italian execution metod,could be an artist "impression".

Uyraell
02-24-2010, 09:14 AM
Nice posters Rudee



I am not familiar with any ww2 italian execution metod,could be an artist "impression".

Panzerknacker, here is where old Roman pre-christian customs come in to it.

Under Roman rule, a traitor having been caught for certain types of offense, was executed with his back to the executioner, it being believed that the traitor had no right to see another human face at the moment of his death.
Similarly with the saboteur, whom, under ancient roman custom, would have been regarded as a type/class of traitor.

Kind Regards my friend, Uyraell.

vss1
02-27-2010, 09:26 AM
I am going to post the image of the Russian lady looking at the German prop. poster in the Posters section and see if Egorka will translate the message. That is an amazing photo. I am guessing the source is some German magazine from WWII?

Braveheart
02-27-2010, 10:19 AM
Hello everyone, I`ve searched the Internet trying to find a place to share a few pics, from some old newspapers, that have come into my possesion.

Apoligies if this is not the right place to put them.

http://i47.tinypic.com/15qb18m.jpg

Braveheart
02-28-2010, 06:00 PM
Two posters were inside this paper, here is the first

http://i50.tinypic.com/345h1me.jpg

Braveheart
02-28-2010, 06:02 PM
And this one

http://i46.tinypic.com/66aof9.jpg

von_Kasbegi414
03-08-2010, 01:13 PM
Can be WW2-like art from today? I say yes.

I had created some art photos, where it see like the WW2 was transported in to todays world... are you interesting enough for my graphical works i have done earlier, they are created from normal photos, but filtered and manipulated...

Panzerknacker
03-09-2010, 07:34 PM
Italian posters attack again!!


a) Let them know, the italian soldier restless struggle is for the LAND

http://i39.tinypic.com/552f4o.jpg


b) Workers of Italy.

The "liberator" is planning right now what to do with our childrens.

http://i44.tinypic.com/2ry4v9t.jpg


c) VICTORY !

For the new social order, for the society wellness.

http://i43.tinypic.com/5lt8cm.jpg


d) The italian women whith her abnegacy and sacrifice walk side by side with the warrior.

http://i42.tinypic.com/nlopd0.jpg

Rising Sun*
03-10-2010, 07:31 AM
The "liberator" is planning right now what to do with our childrens.


http://i44.tinypic.com/2ry4v9t.jpg



This appears to be a plan devised by Catholic priests and or the Christian Brothers.

Thank Christ neither of them were armed.

Panzerknacker
03-10-2010, 06:53 PM
You mean some kind of molestation ? nasty.

Librarian
03-11-2010, 03:28 PM
And after a tiny hiatus, honorable ladies and gentlemen, here are some additional examples of the WW2 art, yet again embedded in certain American wartime advertisings. :)

In pursuit of graphic strength through simplicity and directness, American wartime advertizing suggested incredibly modern echoes of consumerist ideology, distinguishing itself by a combination of artistic skill and wit, although sometimes that funniness was pretty bumpy, like in this example:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Koppers.jpg

WW2 ad – Koppers Oil, 1944

Well, that is compassion at work… and empathy as well. Something almost corporeal to remember, something to empower those bonding human qualities that help us feel closer to others and to become members of a League of True Gentlemen. :roll:

Of course, promulgation of a passionate and lucrative commitment to the Good Cause sometimes was really amusing, like in this case:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Seagrams.jpg

WW2 ad – Seagram’s, 1943

Doomsday for all those hitlerite roaches, moths, fleas, gnats, ticks, wasps, crickets, flies and many other insects’ by a noble Sip and Savor of the smoothness flavor! A toast for a real man who has a sustainable plan to can what he really can! :cool:

The next one is almost poetic. Here is the lyric quintessence of it:

Oh, my good old Marine,
Awake from your sleep!
The girl of your dreams
You now have to upkeep!

And how will you do it?
Well, that’s easy to see;
You must only wash out
Her Lastex Trim-Fit No. 3!

Pretty as an scenic picture,
Staunch as a good friend,
She’ll be yours permanently
Till the World’s distant end!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Monsanto.jpg

WW 2 ad – Monsanto Chemicals, 1942

Whew! Imagine the war without Santomerse detergent… :(

Well, that’s all for today, honorable ladies and gentlemen. In the meantime, as always – all the best! ;)

Panzerknacker
03-11-2010, 04:30 PM
Kind of silly the last 2 ones, powerful the first one. Nice librarian.

Rising Sun*
03-12-2010, 05:20 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-Koppers.jpg

The irony is lost on Koppers.

Koppers Ovens and the related processers were invented by a German, Dr Heinrich Koppers, who was brought to America early in the 20th century by American steel makers to build his ovens for them. In 1914 he sold his interest in the company that became the advertiser, Koppers. He later returned to Germany where he died in 1941, a few years before the Koppers advertisement bragging about how its Koppers processes were helping to defeat Germany.

A final irony is that long after the war Koppers' German company was taken over by Krupp, the great unpunished Nazi industrial war criminal company.

Librarian
03-12-2010, 08:37 PM
Oh no, my dear Mr. Rising Sun – the irony is preserved, because there is a passionate, evident and constant commitment to the Noble Cause & Big Money. That always was and still is the base of all the business, because human society is somehow accustomed to those skillful turnaround specialists. History repeatedly has shown, my esteemed colleague, that people hunger for something larger then themselves. And the one who offers that will have no shortage of income. Or followers. Or both. :(

In fact, higher purpose is such a vital ingredient to the human psyche that leaders, both human and inhuman, have been able to tap into this special human need. They didn’t waste their creative ability in uncongenial work. Unlike both of us, they placed their talents in that richly rewarding field.
And they were not unaccompanied. Please, just observe this one:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2ad-PhilcoCorporation1942.jpg

WW2 ad – Philco Corporation, 1942

Apparently, art’s true love is agitating people. We are a very introverted society, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, and because of our shy nature many of us are unable to find some genuine, exclusively our expressions. That’s why we like those who can and do that for us.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WW2adAmericanLocomotive.jpg

WW2 ad – American Locomotive, 1943

Those people were indeed very talented, and in many ways they have been the outlets we choosed for our self expression. Perhaps being unable to accurately express and identify our raw emotions is a major cause of our fears and our violence. People want the emotions to overtake them. And those blessed specialists gave us permission for that.

As usually, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, everything around us is our own responsibility. :)

And finally, my esteemed partner, allow me just a tiny historical observation. You know, for four hundred years, the Krupp family stormed through history, supplying arms and money to German leaders and using their immense power for their private gratifications. The story of that famous dynasty is one of the most fascinating chronicles of our age, but even today the most prominent savior of that sparkling and inspiring Gild, a true Genius of the Bar, Krupp’s chief counsel, our brilliant colleague Otto Kranzbühler is rarely mentioned.

His defense of Dönitz before the IMT had clearly demonstrated that he really was the most dignified and learned attorney in Nuremberg, and his subsequent appearances for Hermann Röchling and in the Flick case strengthened his mastery of courtroom sparring. Kranzbühler was the only German who really understood the art of cross examination. Without any doubt, he was the greatest lawyer of all international courts of justice – a Dream Lawyer, a Hollywood Lawyer if you wish, the one who was able to always pull magnificent legal rabbits out of his hat. He was comletely able to provide, my dear colleague, absolutely the best justice money can buy.

When asked how much he needed for successful defense, Kranzbühler replied "about a 100.000 £". Since the pound was then worth 4 dollars, this was 400.000 $, and it was only a fraction of the money available for Alfred Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach. The sell-off of Nazi bonds in 1944 – the best guess is that this had been done through Switzerland and Sweden – was underwriting a titanic defense. For every US prosecutor marshalling documents there were three German attorneys counterattacking, and it is a measure of Krupp’s untarnished prestige among his countrymen that Kranzbühler was being assisted by no fewer than 24 advocates who held the prestigious degree of Doktor der Rechte. There was even an expensive American attorney – former US colonel Joseph S. Robinson – in his retinue. Among them they assembled 1309 affidavits (to the Americans’ 380), and two defense witnesses for every prosecution witness.

Yes - money can buy anything, including justice, my esteemed colleague. Alfred’s chief counsel saw some sixty years ago that money and politics are far more important to his client’s future than pure justice. And I am very grateful to this half-forgotten but otherwise truly brilliant man for that everlasting lesson.

Well, that’s all for today. In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentlemen, as always – all the best! :)

rudeerude
03-17-2010, 10:30 PM
Comic book covers.Enjoy!!

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rudeerude
03-17-2010, 10:34 PM
A few more..
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von_Kasbegi414
03-20-2010, 08:46 AM
Those Us comics looks verry funny. but in real these fantastic heroes never lived.

so its just simple soft-propaganda comics for fun,...and just for encouragement of fightning us soldiers.

Rising Sun*
03-21-2010, 06:46 AM
Those Us comics looks verry funny. but in real these fantastic heroes never lived.

so its just simple soft-propaganda comics for fun,...and just for encouragement of fightning us soldiers.

Captain America was real.

Here he is giving Jack Nicholson a ride in 1969, long after the war but still eternally youthful.

http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/imgs/081023/Road-Movies/Easy-Rider-Nicholson_l.jpg

flamethrowerguy
03-21-2010, 05:10 PM
Germany's victory - Europe's freedom

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Schuultz
03-21-2010, 05:14 PM
Germany's victory - Europe's freedom

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Hahahaha, Good One...